Pachinko by Min Jin Lee

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A novel that is at once sweeping and achingly intimate, Pachinko follows several generations of a Korean Japanese family throughout the 20th Century. The glue that holds the narrative together is Sunja, who at age 16 falls pregnant to a married man and ends up marrying a kindly Christian minister who moves their burgeoning family to live in Japan with his brother and sister-in-law. They did not know then that they faced poverty, decades of relentless prejudice from the Japanese and a political climate that would prevent them from ever returning home to Korea.

Sunja's choices, made at such a young age, cast a shadow over her family's future. By the time we leave her in 1989, we are so familiar with the texture of her life – we have felt her shame and regret, her grief, her uncertainty as well as her sureness, her pride and joy, her contentment – that it becomes hard for us too to step out from that shadow.

- Kate