Anna Burns' Milkman wins the 2018 Man Booker Prize

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Anna Burns’ third novel ‘Milkman’ has won the 2018 Man Booker Prize.
The Man Booker Prize, celebrating its 50th anniversary, is worth around $66,000 and Burns is the first writer from Northern Ireland to have be awarded.

In an interview posted by the Man Booker Prize foundation, Burns said that ‘Milkman’ was inspired by her own experience. “I grew up in a place that was rife with violence, distrust and paranoia, and peopled by individuals trying to navigate and survive in that world as best as they could.”

Set in an un-named city but with an astonishing, breath-shorteningly palpable sense of time and place ‘Milkman’ is a tale of gossip and hearsay, silence and deliberate deafness. The story of inaction with enormous consequences and decisions that are never made, but for which people are judged and punished. Middle sister is our protagonist. She is busy attempting to keep her mother from discovering her nearly-boyfriend and to keep everyone in the dark about her encounter with milkman (which she herself for the life of her cannot work out how it came about). But when first brother-in-law, who of course had sniffed it out, told his wife, her first sister, to tell her mother to come and have a talk with her, middle sister becomes 'interesting'. The last thing she ever wanted to be. To be interesting is to be noticed and to be noticed is dangerous. Milkman is a searingly honest novel told in prose that is as precise and unsentimental as it is devastating and brutal. A novel that is at once unlocated and profoundly tethered to place is surely a novel for our times.

Chair of judges Kwame Anthony Appiah comments:

“The language of Anna Burns’ Milkman is simply marvellous; beginning with the distinctive and consistently realised voice of the funny, resilient, astute, plain-spoken, first-person protagonist. From the opening page her words pull us into the daily violence of her world — threats of murder, people killed by state hit squads — while responding to the everyday realities of her life as a young woman, negotiating a way between the demands of family, friends and lovers in an unsettled time. The novel delineates brilliantly the power of gossip and social pressure in a tight-knit community, and shows how both rumour and political loyalties can be put in the service of a relentless campaign of individual sexual harassment….”


Read more about the Man Booker Prize here:
https://themanbookerprize.com/

Michelle de Krester's Life to Come wins The 2018 Miles Franklin Literary Award

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Michelle de Kretser has won the 2018 Miles Franklin Literary Award for her novel The Life to Come, published by Allen & Unwin. This win makes her the third woman in the Award’s 61-year history to win the top prize more than once.  

Michelle joins a select group of female multi-Award winners, including Thea Astley who won the Miles Franklin four times (1962, 1965, 1972, 2000) and is equal record holder with Tim Winton for most wins. Jessica Anderson won the Award twice (1978,1980). Michelle’s previous win was in 2013 for her novel Questions of Travel.

When describing how it feels to win the Miles Franklin for a second time, Michelle said: “I feel twice as lucky, twice as happy, and twice as honoured.”

The Miles Franklin Literary Award, recognised as Australia’s most prestigious literary prize, was established in 1954 through the will of My Brilliant Career author, Stella Maria Miles Franklin. The award is presented to novels of the “highest literary merit” that depict “Australian life in any of its phases”. Perpetual serves as Trustee for the Award.  

Michelle will receive $60,000 in prize money. Her novel was selected from a remarkable shortlist, including: Felicity Castagna’s No More Boats, Eva Hornung’s The Last Garden, Catherine McKinnon’s Storyland, Gerald Murnane’s Border Districts and Kim Scott’s Taboo.

When describing this year’s winning novel, the judges said The Life to Come is a powerful novel that effortlessly blends sharp satire of the literary world with deeply compassionate portraits of lonely people and their strategies for survival.
 
“Sentence-by-sentence, it is elegant, full of life and funny. With her characteristic wit and style, Michelle de Kretser dissects the way Australians see ourselves, and reflects on the ways other parts of the world see us,” said chair of the judging panel and State Library of NSW Mitchell Librarian Richard Neville. 

Richard Neville was joined on the 2018 judging panel by The Australian journalist and columnist, Murray Waldren, Sydney bookseller Lindy Jones, book critic Dr Melinda Harvey and Emeritus Professor Susan Sheridan.

Perpetual’s National Manager of Philanthropy, Caitriona Fay, said: “Perpetual has a long and proud history of helping philanthropists affect real change – change that can last for generations. 

“The Miles Franklin Literary Award has been supporting authors since 1957. It continues to support and shape the Australian literary landscape and broader community. We are honoured to carry on Miles Franklin’s legacy, and I congratulate all of this year’s finalists for ensuring Miles’ passion endures.”

Adam Suckling, Chief Executive of The Copyright Agency, a long-term sponsor of the Award, said: “We are deeply committed to supporting Australian writers and publishers to ensure our uniquely Australian stories continue to be told, We are delighted by Michelle de Kretser’s win. I also want to congratulate the other finalists as it is an impressive achievement to be shortlisted for this prestigious award that goes from strength to strength each year.”

The award was announced at the 2018 Melbourne Writers Festival on 26 August.

For more information about The Miles Franklin Literary Award, visit http://www.milesfranklin.com.au/

 

Limited Edition Feature from Taschen

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*Please contact our store info@oscarandfriends.com.au if you are interested in purchasing this title as this title requires a preorder.*

A production unparalleled in scale, this massive tome offers unrestricted access to hundreds of photographs from the Ferrari Archives and from private collectors, to reveal the full story behind Ferrari’s protagonists, victories, past, and future. Edited by journalist Pino Allievi and enclosed in an aluminum display case designed by Marc Newson, this unique work features a complete appendixgathering all of Ferrari’s victories since 1947.

Collector’s Edition (No. 251–1,947), each numbered and signed by Piero Ferrari.

Few are the men and brands that have come to define a century. For seven decades and counting, the Italian powerhouse founded by Enzo Ferrari in 1947 has made an indelible red mark on popular culture and enraptured fans and collectors across the globe.

Synonymous with beauty, excellence, and unmatched desirability, the Cavallino Rampante lives on as the driving force in high-performance Gran Turismo, the conqueror of impossible challenges.

A project conceived in close collaboration with Ferrari, this massive tome is a veritable collector’s piece. A production unparalleled in scale, it features exclusive content from the Ferrari Archives and private collections around the world, bringing together hundreds of unseen photographs and documents to reveal the unique story behind Ferrari’s victories, its protagonists, and its legacy.

Limited to 1,947 signed and numbered copies, this handcrafted leather-bound and hand-stitched Collector’s Edition is enclosed in a Ferrari motor–inspired aluminum case designed by Marc Newson. The Art Edition (No. 1–250) is elevated by a sculpture evocative of the 12-cylinder engine in hand-bent, flared chromed steel, also by Newson.

Collector’s Edition (No. 251–1,947), each signed by Piero Ferrari.

Also available as an Art Edition (No. 1–250), with a sculptural bookstand by Marc Newson, signed by Piero Ferrari, Sergio Marchionne, and John Elkann.

 

Features:

  • Unprecedented access to the Ferrari archives, and those of private collectors, including hundreds of unseen photographs, drawings, and sketches
  • Original documents of famed Ferrari drivers
  • Never-before-seen appendix gathering all of Ferrari’s victories since 1947

Author: Pino Allievi is an Italian writer and journalist. For years, he has documented the world of sports cars, both as a commentator of Formula 1 for Rai and writing for the likes of La Gazzetta dello Sport. Working with Enzo Ferrari, Allievi wrote Ferrari Racconta, the founder’s last work. He has authored several books not only on the history of cars, but also on its greatest heroes, whom he often knew personally. Allievi was a recipient of the journalistic prize Dino Ferrari, awarded by the creator himself.

Ferrari Art Edition 

isbn 9783836565790

Publication date: October 2018

*Please contact our store info@oscarandfriends.com.au if you are interested in purchasing this title*

CBCA Book of The Year Awards - Winners 2018

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The Children's Book Council of Australia (CBCA) have announced the Winners of the 2018 book of the Year Awards. These awards highlight an extraordinary level of creativity and talent of Australia's children's authors and illustrators. 

Of the 444 entries and 36 shortlisted titles, judges have selected one winner and two honour books for the five Book of the Year Award categories and one winner for the Crichton Award for New Illustrators.

Judges for the 2018 CBCA Book of the Year Awards commented on the wide range of themes including contemporary realism in the Older Readers entries, magical realism and historical fiction for Younger Readers, Indigenous themes and traditional outback settings in the Early Childhood category, and two high quality books with deaf children as their central characters.

The 2018 Book of the Year Award Winners

Book of the Year : Older Readers

Entries in this category may be fiction, drama or poetry and should be appropriate in style and content for readers in their secondary years of schooling. 
Ages 13-18 years (NB: These books are for mature readers)

Winner - Take Three Girls by Cath Crowley, Simmone Howell & Fiona Wood. 

Honour Books - Malee Boys by Charlie Archbold & In Dark Spaces by Cally Black

Book of the Year: Younger Readers

Entries in this category may be fiction, drama or poetry and should be appropriate in style and content for readers from the middle to upper primary years. 
Ages 8-12 years.

Winner - How to Bee by Bren MacDibble

Honour Books - Henrietta and the Perfect Night by Martine Murray and Marsh & ME by Martine Murray

Book of the Year: Early Childhood

Entries in this category may be fiction, drama or poetry and should be appropriate in style and content for children who are at pre-reading or early stages of reading.
Ages 0-7 years

Winner - Rodney Loses It! by Michael Gerald Bauer & illus by Chrissie Krebs

Honour Books - The Very Noisy Baby by Alison Lester and Hark, It's Me, Ruby Lee! by Lisa Shanahan & illus by Binny

Picture Book of the Year

Entries in this category should be outstanding books of the Picture Book genre in which the author and illustrator achieve artistic and literary unity or, in wordless picture books, where the story, theme or concept is unified through illustrations. 
Ages 0-18 years (NB. Some of these books may be for mature readers).

Winner - A Walk in the Bush by Gwyn Perkins

Honour Books - The Great Rabbit Chase by Freya Blackwood and Mopoke by Philip Bunting

Eve Pownall Award

Entries in this category should be books which have the prime intention of documenting factual material with consideration given to imaginative presentation, interpretation and variation of style. Ages 0-18 years

Winner - Do Not Lick This Book by Idan Ben-Barak & illus by Julian Frost

Honour Books - Left & right by Lorna Hendry and Koala by Claire Saxby & illus by Julie Vivas

Crichton Award for New Illustrators

The Crichton Award aims to recognise and encourage new talent in the field of Australian children's book illustration. Ages 0-18 years.

Winner - Tintinnabula by Rovina Cai

 

 

 

 

 

Longlist Announced for 2018 Man Booker Prize

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The longlist, or ‘Man Booker Dozen’, for the £50,000 Man Booker Prize has been announced.

This year’s longlist of 13 books was selected by a panel of five judges: by the philosopher Kwame Anthony Appiah (Chair); crime writer Val McDermid; cultural critic Leo Robson; feminist writer and critic Jacqueline Rose; and artist and graphic novelist Leanne Shapton.

The list was chosen from 171 submissions – the highest number of titles put forward in the prize’s 50 year history – published in the UK and Ireland between 1 October 2017 and 30 September 2018.

The Man Booker Prize for Fiction, first awarded in 1969, is open to writers of any nationality, writing in English and published in the UK and Ireland. This is the first year that novels published in Ireland are eligible for the prize, following a change in rules announced at the start of 2018 that recognised the special relationship between the UK and Irish publishing markets.

The 2018 longlist, or Man Booker ‘Dozen’, of 13 novels, is:

Author (country/territory)          Title (imprint)
Belinda Bauer (UK)                      Snap (Bantam Press)

Anna Burns (UK)                          Milkman (Faber & Faber)

Nick Drnaso (USA)                       Sabrina (Granta Books)

Esi Edugyan (Canada)                 Washington Black (Serpent’s Tail)

Guy Gunaratne (UK)                    In Our Mad And Furious City (Tinder Press)

Daisy Johnson (UK)                     Everything Under (Jonathan Cape)

Rachel Kushner (USA)                The Mars Room (Jonathan Cape)

Sophie Mackintosh (UK)              The Water Cure (Hamish Hamilton)

Michael Ondaatje (Canada)         Warlight (Jonathan Cape)

Richard Powers (USA)                 The Overstory (William Heinemann)

Robin Robertson (UK)                  The Long Take (Picador)

Sally Rooney (Ireland)                  Normal People (Faber & Faber)

Donal Ryan (Ireland)                    From A Low And Quiet Sea (Doubleday Ireland)

 

Chair of the 2018 judges, Kwame Anthony Appiah, says:

“Perhaps unsurprisingly, given the times, there were many dystopian fictions on our bookshelf – and many novels we found inspirational as well as disturbing. Some of those we have chosen for this longlist feel urgent and topical, others might have been admired and enjoyed in any year. All of these books – which take in slavery, ecology, missing persons, inner-city violence, young love, prisons, trauma, race – capture something about a world on the brink. Among their many remarkable qualities is a willingness to take risks with form. And we were struck, overall, by their disruptive power: these novels disrupted the way we thought about things we knew about, and made us think about things we didn’t know about. Still, despite what they have in common, every one of these books is wildly distinctive. It’s been an exhilarating journey so far and we’re looking forward to reading them again. But now we’ll have thousands and thousands of people reading along with us.”
 

This year’s Golden Man Booker winner Michael Ondaatje – a special one-off award that crowned the best work of fiction from the last five decades of the prize – makes the list with his seventh novel Warlight; Ondaatje’s The English Patient shared the 1992 Booker Prize with Sacred Hunger by Barry Unsworth. He is joined by three other authors previously nominated for the prize: Esi Edugyan (shortlisted in 2011 for Half-Blood Blues), Donal Ryan (longlisted in 2013 for The Spinning Heart), and Richard Powers (longlisted in 2014 for Orfeo).

Four debut novels are recognised by the judges this year, including eminent Scottish poet Robin Robertson’s The Long Take, which is a novel in verse, Sophie Mackintosh’s The Water Cure, Guy Gunaratne’s In Our Mad And Furious City and Daisy Johnson’s Everything Under. Johnson, aged 27, is the joint youngest author on the list, alongside Sally Rooney (for Normal People).

Four independent publishers are longlisted: Faber & Faber (with two titles), Granta and Serpent’s Tail. They are joined by Penguin Random House imprints Hamish Hamilton, William Heinemann, Bantam Press and Jonathan Cape (which makes the list three times); Pan Macmillan imprint Picador; Headline, owned by Hachette; and Doubleday Ireland, an imprint of Transworld Ireland.

The UK and Ireland are well-represented, with eight out of the 13 writers on the longlist. Robin Robertson is from Scotland; Belinda Bauer, Guy Gunaratne and Daisy Johnson are from England; Anna Burns is from Northern Ireland; Sophie Mackintosh is from Wales. Sally Rooney and Donal Ryan are from Ireland. Two Canadians make the list, Esi Edugyan and Michael Ondaatje, along with three Americans, Nick Drnaso, Rachel Kushner and Richard Powers. 

Luke Ellis, CEO of Man Group, comments:

“The judges have worked incredibly hard to assemble this year’s longlist, which recognises exceptional literary talent and ranges from debut writers to established novelists. My colleagues and I at Man Group would like to congratulate each of the authors selected.”
 

The shortlist and winner announcements

The shortlist of six books will be announced on Thursday 20 September at a morning press conference at Man Group, the sponsor of the prize. The shortlisted authors each receive £2,500 and a specially bound edition of their book.

The 2018 winner will then be announced on Tuesday 16 October in London’s Guildhall at a black-tie dinner, one of the highlights of the publishing year. The ceremony will be broadcast by the BBC.

The winner of the 2018 Man Booker Prize receives £50,000 and can expect international recognition. In the week following the 2017 winner announcement, sales of Lincoln in the Bardo by George Saunders increased by 1227%. Bloomsbury has to date sold over 230k copies of Lincoln across all formats, 70% of those sales coming after the win.

Speaking to The Independent following his win, Saunders described the experience of having the Man Booker judges approve of his work as “empowering”. He went on to highlight the responsibility he felt to not waste the platform that an accolade of this stature will give him: “As opportunities present themselves to me because of this, I don’t want to misuse them in any way. I don’t want to squander it. I want to use it responsibly and intelligently”.

Shortlist Announced for 2018 Miles Franklin Literary Award

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The shortlist for the prestigious Miles Franklin Literary Award 2018 includes two former winners, Kim Scott and Michelle de Kretser, and four other authors, all of whom have received literary accolades and are strong contenders to receive the $60,000 literary prize in August.

Trustee of the award, Perpetual, alongside Copyright Agency’s Cultural Fund, announced the six authors –four women and two men – on a shortlist that spans genres, histories and cultures. The novels offer readers a remarkable collection of stories dealing with disconnection, dispossession and violence as well as experiences of grief, hope and love. They reflect deeply and often humorously on Australian life in the past, present and future.

Distinctive to this year’s shortlist is the literary talent present, including previous recipients of the award, two-time winner Kim Scott for That Deadman Dance (2011) and Benang (2000), and Michelle de Kretser for Questions of Travel (2013). Joining them is Eva Hornung, whose shortlisted novel The Last Garden won the Premier’s Award in the 2018 Adelaide Festival Awards for Literature and has been shortlisted for the ALS Gold Medal; Gerald Murnane, who has been selected for the first time in his 44-year writing career despite having won much acclaim overseas; Felicity Castagna, for her first move away from her award-winning young adult and children’s fiction with No More Boats; and Catherine McKinnon, an award-winning writer of novels, plays and short stories.

The shortlist shines true to the vision of esteemed My Brilliant Career author Stella Maria Sarah Miles Franklin, who established the award through her will to showcase significant and insightful literature that presents Australian life in any of its phases.

The 2018 Miles Franklin Literary Award Shortlist is:

  • NO MORE BOATS by Felicity Castagna (Giramondo Publishing): A man, once a migrant himself, finds his world imploding. He is forced to retire, his wife has left him, and his children ignore him. The 2001 Tampa crisis is the background to his despair at the disappearance of the certainties he once knew.

     

  • THE LIFE TO COME by Michelle de Kretser (Allen & Unwin): Revolving around three characters in Sydney, Paris and Sri Lanka, this novel is about the stories we tell and don’t tell ourselves as individuals, societies and nations, and highlights how the past and future can change the present.

     

  • THE LAST GARDEN by Eva Hornung (Text Publishing): When Matthias Orion shoots his wife and himself, on the same day their son Benedict returns from boarding school, a small religious community is shattered. Benedict is struck dumb with grief. Their pastor feels his authority challenged by the tragedy. Both must come to terms with the unknowable past and the frailties of being human.

     

  • STORYLAND by Catherine McKinnon (HarperCollins Publishers): Set on Lake Illawarra, this is a compelling novel of five separate narratives which span four centuries. Ultimately all these characters are connected by blood, history, place and memory: together they tell the story of Australia.

     

  • BORDER DISTRICTS by Gerald Murnane (Giramondo Publishing): Similar to the author himself, the narrator of this novel has moved from bustling Melbourne to a small town on the Wimmera Plains, where he intends to spend the last years of his life. Mediating on fragments of his past, exhaustively and compulsively, Border Districts explores the border land between life and death.

     

  • TABOO by Kim Scott (Picador Australia – Pan Macmillan Australia): Set in present-day rural Western Australia, this novel tells the story of a group of Noongar people, who after many decades revisit a taboo area: the site of a massacre. Taboo explores how the Noongar and descendants of the family that initiated the massacre so long ago wrestle with the possibilities of reconciliation.

Speaking on behalf of the judging panel, Mitchell Librarian of the State Library of NSW, Richard Neville, said:

“The Miles Franklin 2018 shortlist engages with the complexities of Australian life in all of its phases, and the legacy of its timeless Indigenous past and its recent European present. All the novels explore how Australians connect with their complex stories, with their emotional histories, and with the legacy of colonisation. Each author in the shortlist considers what it means to live in a particular location, with unique and challenging vision. The vibrancy of contemporary Australian literature, and its relevance to thinking through the challenges of modern Australia, is confirmed with this diverse and intelligent shortlist.”

In addition to Richard Neville, the judging panel includes The Australian journalist and columnist Murray Waldren, Monash University book critic Dr Melinda Harvey, Sydney-based bookseller Lindy Jones, and Emeritus Professor Susan Sheridan.

Perpetual’s National Manager of Philanthropy, Caitriona Fay, congratulated the shortlisted authors.

“The Australian literary community continues to thrive as a result of Stella Miles Franklin’s trailblazing philanthropic endeavour more than 60 years ago. I’d like to congratulate the six shortlisted authors who, through their commitment and dedication, have created engaging novels that reflect Australian life.  Perpetual is proud to act as Trustee for the Miles Franklin Literary Award, Australia’s most prestigious literature prize.”

The Copyright Agency’s Cultural Fund gives a $5000 cash prize to each of the shortlisted authors. Chief Executive of the Copyright Agency Adam Suckling said, “What an exciting shortlist, with a great mix of emerging and established authors. Reading the shortlist is going to be a great pleasure and we are so pleased to be able to give these authors, representing the best of Australian writing, some tangible support for their stellar achievement.”

The winner of the Miles Franklin Literary Award 2018 will be announced in Melbourne on Sunday, 26 August 2018, and will receive $60,000 in prize money for the novel judged as being ‘of the highest literary merit’ and which presents ‘Australian life in any of its phases’. Each of the 2018 shortlisted authors will receive $5,000 from the Copyright Agency’s Cultural Fund.

Longlist Announced for 2018 Miles Franklin Literary Award

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Perpetual, the trustee of the Miles Franklin Literary Award, has announced eleven authors will be competing for the rich literary prize of $60,000, arguably the most prestigious literary accolade in Australia.  

The Miles Franklin Literary Award was established through the will of My Brilliant Career author, Stella Maria Sarah Miles Franklin. Patrick White, the first winner of Australia’s most prestigious literature prize was crowned in 1957 with Voss, and since then the Miles Franklin Literary Award has presented more than $1.1 million to Australian authors.

The Award shines light on some of Australia’s most talented writers, and while the prize has been given to a truly wide scope of novels, it has always remained true to the terms of Miles Franklin’s will; to be of the highest literary merit and presenting Australian life in any phase.

The 2018 Miles Franklin Literary Award longlist is:

  • Peter Carey, A Long Way from Home (Penguin Random House)
  • Felicity Castagna, No More Boats (Giramondo Publishing)
  • Michelle de Kretser, The Life to Come (Allen & Unwin)
  • Lia Hills, The Crying Place (Allen & Unwin)
  • Eva Hornung, The Last Garden (Text Publishing)
  • Wayne Macauley, Some Tests (Text Publishing)
  • Catherine McKinnon, Storyland (HarperCollins Publishers)
  • Gerald Murnane, Border Districts (Giramondo Publishing)
  • Jane Rawson, From the Wreck (Transit Lounge)
  • Michael Sala, The Restorer (Text Publishing)
  • Kim Scott, Taboo (Picador Australia - Pan Macmillan Australia)


“The longlist for the Miles Franklin Literary Award 2018 spans many genres of the novel: historical, fantastical, realist, satirical, allegorical and autobiographical,” said Richard Neville, Mitchell Librarian of the State Library of NSW and head of the Award judging panel.  “The books take us back in time to consider the effects of the past, or address the issues of contemporary life, or give glimpses of an uncertain, even frightening future.”

“Whether dealing with disconnection, dispossession, the many varieties of grief and its resolutions, the violence done to those close or those unknown, or the deeper questions of existence, the eleven longlisted novels engage and reward the reader,” added Neville.

Joining Richard Neville on the judging panel is The Australian journalist and columnist, Murray Waldren, book critic Dr Melinda Harvey, Sydney-based bookseller, Lindy Jones and Emeritus Professor, Susan Sheridan.

Perpetual’s National Manager of Philanthropy, Caitriona Fay, commended the longlisted authors.

“The authors named on this year’s longlist represent some of Australia’s most talented and provocative novelists. For more than 60 years, the Miles Franklin Literary Award has been supporting authors and helping to foster a uniquely Australian literature.

“The Award is a testament to the generosity of Miles Franklin and shows the difference one person can make to a community. Perpetual is proud to support Australia’s most prestigious literature prize. It’s a great example of how, with management, philanthropic donations can grow well beyond their original intentions.,” added Fay.

Some of the notable winners of the Miles Franklin Literary Award include: Tim Winton with Breath (2009), Dirt Music (2002), Cloudstreet (1992) and Shallows (1984).  Winton shares the crown for most wins with Thea Astley for Drylands (2000), The Acolyte (1972), The Slow Natives (1965) and The Well Dressed Explorer (1962). Peter Carey has won three times for Jack Maggs (1998), Oscar and Lucinda (1989) and Bliss (1981), and Kim Scott twice for That Deadman Dance (2011) and Benang (2000).

The shortlisted finalists will be revealed on Sunday, 17 June at the Annual Australian Booksellers Association (ABA) Gala Dinner in Canberra.  The winner announcement will be made on Sunday, 26 August in Melbourne.

Winner Announced for 2018 Man Booker International Prize

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The 2018 winner for the Man Booker International Prize is Flights by Olga Tokarczuk, translated by Jennifer Croft.

Flights is a novel about travel in the 21st century and human anatomy. From the 17th  century, we have the story of the real Dutch anatomist Philip Verheyen, who dissected and drew pictures of his own amputated leg, discovering in so doing the Achilles tendon. From the 18th century, we have the story of a North African-born slave turned Austrian courtier stuffed and put on display after his death in spite of his daughter’s ever more desperate protests, as well as the story of Chopin’s heart as it makes the covert journey from Paris to Warsaw, stored in a tightly sealed jar beneath his sister’s skirt. From the present we have the trials and tribulations of a wife accompanying her much older professor husband as he teaches a course on a cruise ship in the Greek islands, the quest of a Polish woman who emigrated to New Zealand as a teenager but must now return to Poland in order to poison her terminally ill high school sweetheart, and the slow descent into madness of a young husband whose wife and child mysteriously vanished on a vacation on a Croatian island and then appeared again with no explanation.

Through these narratives, interspersed with short bursts of analysis and digressions on topics ranging from travel-sized cosmetics to the Maori, Flights guides the reader beyond the surface layer of modernity and towards the core of the very nature of humankind.

Host a Great Book Swap This National Reconciliation Week

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As we approach National Reconciliation Week this month, we reflect on this year's theme: 'LEARN, SHARE, GROW – DON'T KEEP HISTORY A MYSTERY'. Here, we are invited to explore our past as a country; learn, share and acknowledge Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander histories and cultures; and develop a deeper understanding of our national story.

What are you doing this National Reconciliation Week? We invite you to hold a Great Book Swap in your workplace. It is an opportunity to LEARN about Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander history, culture and literature; SHARE books; and GROW your understanding of our national story. 

The idea is to swap a pre-loved book with someone else's, in exchange for a $5 donation. This helps us buy new books for children in remote communities who have few to none.  

Books are the central building blocks for learning to read, and having the ability to read opens doors to a world of choice and opportunity. This year, we are aiming to raise $300,000 from the Great Book Swap to help us gift 30,000 books in 2018. 

Sign up for the Great Book Swap here.

ABIA 2018 Winners Announced

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The Australian Publishers Association is thrilled to announce the winners of the 2018 Australian Book Industry Awards (ABIAs). 

Nevermoor picked up three awards including the major award of the night, The Gold ABIA for the Book of the Year, along with the Matt Richell Award for New Writer of the Year and Book of the Year for Younger Readers.

The inaugural Rising Star of the Year was awarded to Shalini Kunalan from Text Publishing. Publisher of the Year went to HarperCollins while Thames & Hudson received Small Publisher of the Year. Dymocks was awarded National Retailer of the Year, and once again Readings won Independent Retailer of the Year

Suzy Wilson, owner of Brisbane’s Riverbend Books and the founder of the highly respected Indigenous Literary Foundation, was presented with the Lloyd O’Neil Award for Outstanding Service to the Australian Book Industry, and the Pixie O’Harris Award for Outstanding Commitment to Children’s Literature was awarded to Jane Covernton.

See the full list of winners

 

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Longlists Announced for the 2018 Kibble and Dobbie Awards

The longlists for the 2018 Kibble and Dobbie Literary Awards have been announced.

The Kibble and Dobbie Literary Awards are open to Australian female writers who have published a book of fiction or non-fiction classifiable as ‘life writing’. The awards moved to a biennial format in 2016, making the 2018 awards open to any work published in the last two years.

The eight longlisted titles for the $30,000 Nita B Kibble Literary Award for an established author are:

  • Mirror Sydney by Vanessa Berry
  • The Enigmatic Mr Deakin by Judith Brett
  • The Hate Race by Maxine Beneba Clarke
  • Everywhere I Look by Helen Garner
  • The Life to Come by Michelle de Kretser
  • The Choke by Sofie Laguna
  • The High Places by Fiona McFarlane
  • The Media and the Massacre by Sonya Voumard

The eight longlisted titles for the $5000 Dobbie Literary Award for a first-time published author are:

  • Australia Day by Melanie Cheng
  • Troppo by Madelaine Dickie
  • Our Magic Hour by Jennifer Down
  • Things That Helped by Jessica Friedmann
  • The Permanent Resident by Roanna Gonsalves
  • Driftwood by Eva De Jong-Duldig
  • The Trauma Cleaner by Sarah Krasnostein
  • The Healing Party by Micheline Lee

The shortlists will be announced in June. For more information about the Kibble and Dobbie Literary Awards, click here.

Shortlist Announced for 2018 Man Booker International Prize

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The Man Booker International Prize reveals the shortlist of six books in contention for the 2018 prize, which celebrates the finest works of translated fiction from around the world. The £50,000 prize for the winning book will be divided equally between its author and translator.

The 2018 shortlist is as follows:

Author (country/territory), Translator, Title, (imprint)                   

  • Virginie Despentes (France), Frank Wynne, Vernon Subutex 1 (MacLehose Press)
     
  • Han Kang (South Korea), Deborah Smith, The White Book (Portobello Books)
     
  • László Krasznahorkai (Hungary), John Batki, Ottilie Mulzet & George Szirtes, The World Goes On (Tuskar Rock Press)
     
  • Antonio Muñoz Molina (Spain), Camilo A. Ramirez, Like a Fading Shadow (Tuskar Rock Press)
     
  • Ahmed Saadawi (Iraq), Jonathan Wright, Frankenstein in Baghdad (Oneworld)
     
  • Olga Tokarczuk (Poland), Jennifer Croft, Flights (Fitzcarraldo Editions)

The list includes Han Kang and Deborah Smith, who won the prize in 2016 for The Vegetarian, and László Krasznahorkai, who won the prize in its former iteration in 2015, when it was awarded for an achievement in fiction evident in a body of work. The list spans four European languages: French, Spanish, Hungarian, Polish; one from South Korea, and one from Iraq, in Arabic.

The settings range from the rock music scene in Paris, to the streets of Baghdad where a monster roams wild, to James Earl Ray’s short stay in Lisbon fleeing law enforcement; two novels span the globe, one charting Chopin’s heart making a covert voyage from Paris to Warsaw, and one featuring men on the edge of despair in Kiev, Varanasi and Shanghai; with one novel being a meditation on the colour white and an investigation of mourning and rebirth.

The translators are all at the forefront of their craft, with John Batki, Ottilie Mulzet and George Szirtes a well-established team for Krasznahorkai and Deborah Smith translating every work by Han Kang. Frank Wynne comes through with his French translation, having also been longlisted for a translation from Spanish.

The shortlist is dominated by independent publishers, with two books from Tuskar Rock Press, and one each from MacLehose Press, Portobello Books, Oneworld and Fitzcarraldo Editions.

Lisa Appignanesi, chair of the 2018 Man Booker International Prize judging panel, comments:

‘This is a shortlist emblematic of the many adventures of fiction – its making and reading. We have mesmeric meditations, raucous, sexy, state- of- the- nation stories, haunting sparseness and sprawling tales; enigmatic cabinets of curiosity, and daring acts of imaginative projection – all this plus sparkling encounters with prose in translation. We were sorry to have shed so much of our longlist talent, but this is a shortlist to read and re-read.’

More judges’ comments on each book can be found in ‘Book synopses and biographies’ in the lower part of this release.

Luke Ellis, CEO of Man Group, comments:

Congratulations to the authors and translators included on the shortlist, which recognises talent and creativity from around the world. We are proud to support the Man Booker International Prize’s celebration of international literary excellence, as well as the important charitable work of the Booker Prize Foundation in promoting literature and literacy.’

The longlist was selected by a panel of five judges, chaired by Lisa Appignanesi OBE, author and cultural commentator, and consisting of; Michael Hofmann, poet, reviewer and translator from German; Hari Kunzru, author of five novels including The Impressionist and White Tears; Tim Martin, journalist and literary critic, and Helen Oyeyemi, author of novels, plays and short stories including The Icarus Girl.

The winner of the 2018 prize will be announced on 22 May at a formal dinner at the Victoria & Albert Museum in London, with the £50,000 prize being divided equally between the author and the translator of the winning book.

Leading up to the winner announcement, there will be a number of public events featuring some of the judges, authors and translators:

  • 17 May            ‘Translation at its Finest’ event in partnership with Foyles and English PEN at Foyles, Charing Cross Road, London
  • 21 May             Man Booker International Prize event with Waterstones at The Emmanuel Centre, Westminster, London

The Man Booker International Prize and the Man Booker Prize for Fiction together reward the best books from around the globe that are published in the UK and are available in English.

The prize is sponsored by Man Group, an active investment management firm that also sponsors the Man Booker Prize for Fiction. Both prizes strive to recognise and reward the finest in contemporary literature.

Shortlist Announced for 2018 CBCA Awards

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The Book of the Year: Older Readers

  • Mallee Boys (Charlie Archbold, Wakefield Press)

  • In the Dark Spaces (Cally Black, HGE)

  • Take Three Girls (Cath Crowley, Fiona Wood & Simmone Howell, Pan Macmillan)

  • Because of You (Pip Harry, UQP)

  • The Secret Science of Magic (Melissa Keil, HGE)

  • Ballad For a Mad Girl (Vikki Wakefield, Text)

 

The Book of the Year: Younger Readers

  • The Elephant (Peter Carnavas, UQP)

  • How to Bee (Bren MacDibble, A&U)

  • Marsh and Me (Martine Murray, Text)

  • Henrietta and the Perfect Night (Martine Murray, A&U)

  • The Shop at Hoopers Bend (Emily Rodda, HarperCollins)

  • The Grand Genius Summer of Henry Hoobler (Lisa Shanahan, A&U)

 

The Book of the Year: Early Childhood

  • Rodney Loses It (Michael Gerard Bauer, illus by Chrissie Krebs, Omnibus)

  • Boy (Phil Cummings, illus by Shane DeVries, Scholastic)

  • I’m Australian Too (Mem Fox, illus by Ronojoy Ghosh, Omnibus)

  • The Second Sky (Patrick Guest, illus by Jonathan Bentley, Little Hare)

  • The Very Noisy Baby (Alison Lester, illus by Alison Lester, Affirm)

  • Hark, It’s Me, Ruby Lee! (Lisa Shanahan, illus by Binny, Hachette)

 

    Picture Book of the Year

    • Ten Pound Pom (Carole Wilkinson, illus by Liz Anelli, Walker Books)

    • The Great Rabbit Chase (Freya Blackwood, Scholastic)

    • Mopoke (Philip Bunting, Omnibus)

    • A Walk in the Bush (Gwyn Perkins, Affirm)

    • Swan Lake (Anne Spudvilas, A&U)

    • Florette (Anna Walker, PRH)

     

    Eve Pownall Award for Information Books

    • Do Not Lick This Book (Idan Ben-Barak, illus by Julian Frost, A&U)

    • M Is For Mutiny! History By Alphabet (John Dickon, illus by Bern Emmerichs, Berbay)

    • Left & Right (Lorna Hendry, Wild Dog Books)

    • The Big Book Of Antarctica (Charles Hope, Wild Dog Books)

    • Amazing Australians In Their Flying Machines (Prue & Kerry Mason, illus by Tom Jellett, Walker Books)

    • Koala (Claire Saxby, illus by Julie Vivas, Walker Books

     

    Crichon Award for New Illustrators

    • Can You Find Me? (Patrick Shirvington, New Frontier Publishing)
    • I Just Ate My Friend (Heidi McKinnon, Allen & Unwin)
    • Mopoke (Philip Bunting, Omnibus Books)
    • Once Upon an ABC (Christopher Nielsen, Little Hare)
    • The Sloth Who Came to Say (Vivienne To, Allen & Unwin)
    • Tintinnabula (Rovina Cai, Little Hare)

     

    The winners will be announced on 17 August.

    CBCA Announce Notables for 2018

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    Congratulations to all CBCA Notables Authors, Illustrators and Publishers for 2018.

    The Book of the Year: Older Readers

    • Mallee Boys (Charlie Archbold, Wakefield Press)

    • The Fall (Tristan Bancks, PRH)

    • In the Dark Spaces (Cally Black, HGE)

    • Night Swimming (Steph Bowe, Text)

    • The Things we Promise (J C Burke, A&U)

    • The Dream Walker (Victoria Carless, Hachette)

    • Beautiful Mess (Claire Christian, Text)

    • My Lovely Frankie (Judith Clarke, A&U)

    • The Tides Between (Elizabeth Jane Corbett, Odyssey Books)

    • Take Three Girls (Cath Crowley, Fiona Wood & Simmone Howell, Pan Macmillan)

    • The Ones that Disappeared (Zana Fraillon, Hachette)

    • Third Witch (Jackie French, HarperCollins)

    • Sparrow (Scot Gardner, A&U)

    • Because of You (Pip Harry, UQP)

    • A Shadow’s Breath (Nicole Hayes, PRH)

    • The Secret Science of Magic (Melissa Keil, HGE)

    • Mr Romanov’s Garden in the Sky (Robert Newton, PRH)

    • Frogkisser! (Garth Nix, A&U)

    • Gap Year in Ghost Town (Michael Pryor, A&U)

    • Wilder Country (Mark Smith, Text)

    • A Semi-Definitive List of World Nightmares (Krystal Sutherland, PRH)

    • Remind Me How This Ends (Gabrielle Tozer, HarperCollins)

    • Ballad For a Mad Girl (Vikki Wakefield, Text)

    • The Undercurrent (Paula Weston, Text)

    • My Life as a Hashtag (Gabrielle Williams, A&U)

     

     

    The Book of the Year: Younger Readers

    • Too Many Friends (Kathryn Apel, UQP)

    • May Tang (Katrina Beikoff, Omnibus)

    • The Elephant (Peter Carnavas, UQP)

    • Shaozhen (Wai Chim & Lyn White, A&U)

    • The Blue Cat (Ursula Dubosarsky, A&U)

    • 1917 (Kelly Gardiner, Scholastic)

    • The Cursed First Term of Zelda Stitch (Nikki Greenberg, A&U)

    • Mr Bambuckle’s Remarkables (Tim Harris, illus by James Hart, PRH)

    • Jehan and the Quest of the Lost Dog (Rosanne Hawke, UQP)

    • Hotaka (John Heffernan, A&U)

    • Blossom (Tamsin Janu, Omnibus)

    • Figgy Takes the City (Tamsin Janu, Omnibus)

    • Pip and Houdini (J C Jones, A&U)

    • A Dog’s Tale (Barry Jonsberg, Omnibus)

    • The Sorry Tale of Fox and Bear (Margrete Lamond, illus by Heather Vallance, Dirt Lane Press)

    • How to Bee (Bren MacDibble, A&U)

    • The Skeleton Coast (Mardi McConnochie, A&U)

    • Whimsy and Woe (Rebecca McRitchie, illus by Sonia Kretschmar, HarperCollins)

    • The Fighting Stingrays (Simon Mitchell, PRH)

    • The Extremely Inconvenient Adventures of Bronte Mettlestone (Jaclyn Moriarty, A&U)

    • Lintang and the Pirate Queen (Tamara Moss, PRH)

    • Looking Up (Sally Murphy, Fremantle Press)

    • Marsh and Me (Martine Murray, Text)

    • Henrietta and the Perfect Night (Martine Murray, A&U)

    • The Girl, the Dog and the Writer in Rome (Katrina Nannestad, HarperCollins)

    • Dr Boogaloo and the Girl who Lost her Laughter (Lisa Nicol, PRH)

    • The Wayward Witch and the Feelings Monster (Sally Rippin, HGE)

    • The Shop at Hoopers Bend (Emily Rodda, HarperCollins)

    • A Garden of Lilies: Improving Tales for Young Minds (Judith Rossell, HarperCollins)

    • The Exile (Jo Sandhu, PRH)

    • The Grand Genius Summer of Henry Hoobler (Lisa Shanahan, A&U)

    • Accidental Heroes (Lian Tanner, A&U)

    • Captain Jimmy Cook Discovers X Marks the Spot (Jol & Kate Temple, illus by John Foye, A&U)

    • Nevermoor: The Trials of Morrigan Crow (Jessica Townsend, Hachette)

    • A Cardboard Palace (Allayne L Webster, MidnightSun)

    • The Secrets We Share (Nova Weetman, UQP)

    • Trouble and the New Kid (Cate Whittle, illus by Stephen Michael King, Omnibus)

     

    Early Childhood

    • The Thank You Dish (Trace Balla, A&U)

    • Shapes of Australia (Bronwyn Bancroft, Little Hare)

    • Rodney Loses It (Michael Gerard Bauer, illus by Chrissie Krebs, Omnibus)

    • Busting (Aaron Blabey, Scholastic)

    • Guff (Aaron Blabey, PRH)

    • Pig the Star (Aaron Blabey, Scholastic)

    • The Very Sleepy Bear (Nick Bland, Scholastic)

    • You Can’t Catch Me (Nicola Bolton, Nicola Bolton)

    • Busy Little Creatures (Fiona Bowden, Little Book Press)

    • At the Zoo I See (Joshua Button, illus by Robyn Wells, Magabala)

    • Heads and Tails (John Canty, Berbay)

    • Our Last Trip to the Market (Lorin Clarke, illus by Mitch Vane, A&U)

    • The Cat Wants Cuddles (P Crumble, illus by Lucinda Gifford, Scholastic)

    • Boy (Phil Cummings, illus by Shane DeVries, Scholastic)

    • Wilbur, Grace and Joe (Phil Cummings, illus by Amanda Graham, Little Book Press)

    • Jump and Shout (Mike Dumbleton, illus by Peter Carnavas, Little Book Press)

    • I’m Australian Too (Mem Fox, illus by Ronojoy Ghosh, Omnibus)

    • Stitches and Stuffing (Carrie Gallasch, illus by Sara Acton, Little Hare)

    • Great Goal! Marvellous Mark! (Katrina Germein, illus by Janine Dawson, Ford Street)

    • Clare’s Goodbye (Libby Gleeson, illus by Anna Pignataro, Little Hare)

    • Meerkat Choir (Nikki Greenberg, A&U)

    • The Second Sky (Patrick Guest, illus by Jonathan Bentley, Little Hare)

    • On the Way to Nana’s (Frances & Lindsay Haji-Ali, illus by David Hardy, Magabala)

    • Nomax! (Shannon Horsfall, HarperCollins)

    • 1,2, Pirate Stew (Kylie Howarth, The Five Mile Press)

    • Me and You (Deborah Kelly, illus by Karen Blair, PRH)

    • The Very Noisy Baby (Alison Lester, illus by Alison Lester, Affirm)

    • Ready, Steady, Hatch! (Ben Long, illus by David Cornish, Ford Street)

    • Olivia’s Voice (Mike Lucas, illus by Jennifer Harrison, MidnightSun)

    • What’s Up Top? (Marc Martin, PRH)

    • Two Rainbows (Sophie Masson, illus by Michael McMahon, Little Hare)

    • Hello to You, Moon (Sally Morgan & Biddy Maroney, illus by Sonny Day, Little Hare)

    • The Rabbit-hole Golf Course (Ella Mulvey, illus by Karen Briggs, A&U)

    • My Dog Socks (Robyn Osborne, illus by Sadami Konchi, Ford Street)

    • Road Trip (Danny Parker, illus by Nathaniel Eckstrom, Little Hare)

    • Lucy’s Book (Natalie Jane Prior, illus by Cheryl Orsini, Hachette)

    • Hark, It’s Me, Ruby Lee! (Lisa Shanahan, illus by Binny, Hachette)

    • Eric the Postie (Matt Shanks, Scholastic)

    • Molly the Pirate (Lorraine Teece, illus by Paul Seden, Magabala)

    • The Scared Book (Debra Tidball, illus by Kim Siew, Hachette)

    • Why Can’t I Be a Dinosaur? (Kylie Westaway, illus by Tom Jellett, A&U)

    • One Keen Koala (Margaret Wild, illus by Bruce Whatley, Scholastic)

    • That Christmas Feeling (Lili Wilkinson, illus by Amanda Francey, A&U)

    • Can You Find Me? (Gordon Winch, illus by Patrick Shirvington, New Frontier Publishing)

    • Nanna’s Button Tin (Dianne Wolfer, illus by Heather Potter, Walker Books)

     

      Picture Book

      • Ten Pound Pom (Carole Wilkinson, illus by Liz Anelli, Walker Books)

      • Aquatica (Lance Balchin, Five Mile)

      • Gaolbird: the True Story of William Swallow, Convict and Pirate (Simon Barnard, Text)

      • The Second Sky (Patrick Guest, illus by Jonathan Bentley, Little Hare)

      • Tales From a Tall Forest (Shaun Micallef, illus by Jonathan Bentley, HGE)

      • Guff (Aaron Blabey, PRH)

      • The Great Rabbit Chase (Freya Blackwood, Scholastic)

      • The Anzac Tree (Christina Booth, Omnibus)

      • Mopoke (Philip Bunting, Omnibus)

      • Heads and Tails (John Canty, Berbay)

      • Andy Webb: Artist (Maree Coote, Melbournestyle Books)

      • Mille Loves Ants (Jackie French, illus by Sue deGennaro, HarperCollins)

      • Jerome’s Gift (Trent Denham, Condotta Press)

      • The World’s Worst Pirate (Michelle Worthington, illus by Katrin Dreiling, Little Pink Dog Books)

      • Drawn Onward (Meg McKinlay, illus by Andrew Frazer, Fremantle Press)

      • Papa Sky (Jane Jolly, illus by Sally Heinrich, MidnightSun)

      • The Man in the Panama Hat and the Windy, Windy Day (Joachim Gevert, illus by Ffranses Ingram, Little Steps)

      • A Very Quacky Christmas (Frances Watts, illus by Ann James, HarperCollins)

      • Grandma Forgets (Paul Russell, illus by Nicky Johnston, EK Books)

      • Whatcha Building? (Andrew Daddo, illus by Stephen Michael King, HarperCollins)

      • Pea Pod Lullaby (Glenda Millard, illus by Stephen Michael King, A&U)

      • Danny Blue’s Really Excellent Dream (Max Landrak, Hachette)

      • Feathers (Phil Cummings, illus by Phil Lesnie, Scholastic)

      • The Very Noisy Baby (Alison Lester, Affirm)

      • Archie and the Bear (Zanni Louise, illus by David Mackintosh, Little Hare)

      • Slowly! Slowly! (Tina Clarke, illus by Helene Magisson, Wombat Books)

      • What’s Up Top? (Marc Martin, PRH)

      • Big Fella Rain (Beryl Webber, illus by Fern Martins, Magabala)

      • Henry’s Pirate Adventure (Livinia Nixon, illus by Heath McKenzie, Lake Press)

      • Sarah and the Steep Slope (Danny Parker, illus by Matt Ottley, Little Hare)

      • A Walk in the Bush (Gwyn Perkins, Affirm)

      • Giants, Trolls, Witches, Beasts (Craig Phillips, A&U)

      • Clare’s Goodbye (Libby Gleeson, illus by Anna Pignataro, Little Hare)

      • Glitch (Michelle Worthington, illus by Andrew Plant, Ford Street)

      • Merry Everything (Tania McCartney, illus by Jess Racklyeft, Windy Hollow Books)

      • Monsieur Chat (Jedda Robaard, Five Mile)

      • Once Upon a Small Rhinoceros (Meg McKinlay, illus by Leila Rudge, Walker Books)

      • Gus Dog Goes to Work (Rachel Flynn, illus by Craig Smith, HarperCollins)

      • Swan Lake (Anne Spudvilas, A&U)

      • Fish (Jane Stadermann, Rabbit Books)

      • My Friend Tertius (Corinne Fenton, illus by Owen Swan, A&U)

      • Storm Whale (Sarah Brennan, illus by Jane Tanner, A&U)

      • The Sloth Who Came to Stay (Margaret Wild, illus by Vivienne To, A&U)

      • The Sleeping Beauty (David McAllister, illus by Gabriela Tylesova, Little Hare)

      • Florette (Anna Walker, PRH)

      • Koala Bare (Jackie French, illus by Bruce Whatley, HarperCollins)

      • Ruben (Bruce Whatley, Scholastic)

      • Flapper VC (Mark Wilson, Hachette)

       

      Eve Pownall Award for Information Books

      • Do Not Lick This Book (Idan Ben-Barak, illus by Julian Frost, A&U)

      • Tears In The Jungle: Fight For Survival (Daniel & William Clarke, Tears In The Jungle)

      • Decision: Stories Of Leadership In The Services (Jennet Cole-Adams, & Judy Gauld, Department Of Veterans’ Affairs)

      • Robyn Boid: Architect (Maree Coote, Melbournestyle Books)

      • The Baby Animal Book (Jennifer Cossins, Hachette)

      • Comradeship: Stories Of Friendship And Recreation In Wartime (Kathleen Cusack & Brett Hatherly, Department Of Veterans’ Affairs)

      • M Is For Mutiny! History By Alphabet (John Dickon, illus by Bern Emmerichs, Berbay)

      • Animal Eco-Warriors (Nic Gill, CSIRO Publishing)

      • Exploring Soils: A Hidden World Underground (Samantha Grover, illus by Camille Heisler, CSIRO Publishing)

      • Left & Right (Lorna Hendry, Wild Dog Books)

      • The Big Book Of Antarctica (Charles Hope, Wild Dog Books)

      • A Is For Australian Animals (Frane Lessac, Walker Books)

      • The Story Of Australia (Robert Lewis, PRH)

      • Amazing Australians In Their Flying Machines (Prue & Kerry Mason, illus by Tom Jellett, Walker Books)

      • My Contemporary Art Book (Kate Ryan, illus by Cally Bennett, National Gallery Of Victoria)

      • Van Gogh And The Seasons (Kate Ryan, illus by Cally Bennett, National Gallery Of Victoria)

      • Koala (Claire Saxby, illus by Julie Vivas, Walker Books)

      • The Startling Story Of Lachlan Macquarie: Founding Father Or Failure? (Michael Sedunary, illus by Bern Emmerichs, Berbay).

       

      The Notable Books act as the longlist for the CBCA Book of the Year Awards. The shortlist will be announced on 27 March, and the winners on 17 August.

       

      Longlist Announced for the 2018 ABIA Book Awards

      We’re thrilled to announce the longlist for the 2018 Australian Book Industry Awards (ABIAs). The 2018 longlist celebrates the diversity and exceptional quality of Australian writing, publishing and bookselling.

      The longlist was voted for by the ABIA Academy, a group of publishers, booksellers, agents, media and industry representatives. After an extensive recruitment campaign, the 2018 academy is the largest and broadest in ABIA history, comprising over 250 members.

      A shortlist will be released on Thursday April 19, with the winners announced at the publishing industry’s night of nights on Thursday 3 May. The red carpet event will be held at Sydney’s International Convention Centre and hosted by ABC TV’s Zoe Norton-Lodge and Ben Jenkins (The Checkout).

      ABIA would like to thank our valued sponsors – The Australian Women’s Weekly, JC Decaux, Media Super, Audible, Opus, Booktopia, Curtis Brown, Ingram, Nielsen Bookscan, Leading Edge Books, Simpsons Solicitors, John Fisher Printing, and our industry partners, ABA, ALIA, APA, ASA, BorrowBox, The Copyright Agency , Books + Publishing and the Children’s Book Council.

       

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      Biography Book of the Year

      • A Writing Life: Helen Garner and Her Work, Bernadette Brennan (Text Publishing, Text Publishing)
      • Danger Music, Eddie Ayres (Allen & Unwin, Allen & Unwin)
      • The Enigmatic Mr Deakin, Judith Brett (Text Publishing, Text Publishing)
      • Tracker, Alexis Wright (Giramondo Publishing, Giramondo Publishing Company)
      • Unbreakable, Jelena Dokic and Jess Halloran (Ebury Australia, Penguin Random House Australia)
      • Unmasked, Turia Pitt (Ebury Australia, Penguin Random House Australia)
      • Wednesdays with Bob, Derek Rielly and Bob Hawke (Macmillan Australia, Pan Macmillan Australia,)
      • Working Class Man, Jimmy Barnes (HarperCollins Publishers, HarperCollins Publishers)

       

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      General Fiction Book of the Year

      • Force of Nature, Jane Harper (Macmillan Australia, Pan Macmillan Australia)
      • On the Java Ridge, Jock Serong (Text Publishing, Text Publishing)
      • The Dark Lake, Sarah Bailey (Allen & Unwin, Allen & Unwin)
      • The Girl from Munich, Tania Blanchard (Simon & Schuster Australia, Simon & Schuster Australia)
      • The Inaugural Meeting Of The Fairvale Ladies Book Club, Sophie Green (Hachette, Hachette Australia)
      • The Secrets She Keeps, Michael Robotham (Hachette, Hachette Australia)
      • The Tea Gardens, Fiona McIntosh (Michael Joseph Australia, Penguin Random House Australia)
      • The Trip of A Lifetime, Monica McInerney (Michael Joseph Australia, Penguin Random House Australia)

       

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      General Non-fiction Book of the Year

      • Anaesthesia: The Gift of Oblivion and the Mystery of Consciousness, Kate Cole-Adams (Text Publishing, Text Publishing)
      • Being 14, Madonna King (Hachette, Hachette Australia)
      • Depends What You Mean By Extremist, John Safran (Hamish Hamilton Australia, Penguin Random House Australia)
      • First, We Make The Beast Beautiful, Sarah Wilson (Macmillan Australia, Pan Macmillan Australia)
      • Not Just Lucky, Jamila Rizvi (Viking Australia, Penguin Random House Australia)
      • Saga Land, Richard Fidler and Kári Gíslason (ABC Books, HarperCollins Publishers)
      • Taming Toxic People, David Gillespie (Macmillan Australia, Pan Macmillan Australia)
      • The Harbour: A City’s Heart, A Country’s Soul, Scott Bevan (Simon & Schuster Australia, Simon & Schuster Australia)
      • The Trauma Cleaner: One Woman’s Extraordinary Life in Death, Decay & Disaster, Sarah Krasnostein (Text Publishing, Text Publishing)

       

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      Illustrated Book of the Year

      • Basics to Brilliance Kids, Donna Hay (Fourth Estate, HarperCollins Publishers)
      • Cornersmith: Salads and Pickles, Alex Elliott-Howery and Sabine Spindler (Murdoch Books, Murdoch Books)
      • Hummus and Co, Michael Rantissi and Kristy Frawley (Murdoch Books, Murdoch Books)
      • Maggie’s Recipe for Life, Maggie Beer and Professor Ralph Martins (A Julie Gibbs Book for Simon & Schuster Australia, Simon & Schuster Australia)
      • Native: Art and Design with Australian Plants, Kate Herd and Jela Ivankovic-Waters (Thames & Hudson Australia, Thames & Hudson Australia)
      • Ostro, Julia Busuttil Nishimura (Plum, Pan Macmillan Australia)
      • Paris: Through a Fashion Eye, Megan Hess (Hardie Grant Books, Hardie Grant Publishing)
      • The Vegetable, Caroline Griffiths and Vicki Valsamis (Smith Street Books, Smith Street Books)

       

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      International Book of the Year

      • Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine, Gail Honeyman (HarperCollins Publishers, HarperCollins Publishers)
      • Good Night Stories for Rebel Girls, Elena Favilli and Francesa Cavallo (Particular Books -UK Juvenile, Penguin Random House Australia)
      • Here We Are: Notes For Living On Planet Earth, Oliver Jeffers (HarperCollins Publishers, HarperCollins Publishers)
      • Home Fire, Kamila Shamsie (Bloomsbury Circus, Bloomsbury Publishing)
      • La Belle Sauvage: The Book of Dust Volume One, Philip Pullman (David Fickling Books, Penguin Random House Australia)
      • Lincoln in the Bardo, George Saunders (Bloomsbury Publishing, Bloomsbury Publishing)
      • Mythos, Stephen Fry (Michael Joseph – UK, Penguin Random House Australia)
      • The Sun and her Flowers, Rupi Kaur (Simon & Schuster UK, Simon & Schuster UK)

       

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      Literary Fiction Book of the Year

      • A Long Way Home, Peter Carey (Hamish Hamilton Australia, Penguin Random House Australia)
      • Australia Day, Melanie Cheng (Text Publishing, Text Publishing)
      • First Person, Richard Flanagan (Knopf Australia, Penguin Random House Australia)
      • See What I Have Done, Sarah Schmidt (Hachette, Hachette Australia)
      • Taboo, Kim Scott (Picador Australia, Pan Macmillan Australia)
      • The Choke, Sofie Laguna (Allen & Unwin, Allen & Unwin)
      • The Life to Come, Michelle de Kretser (Allen & Unwin, Allen & Unwin)
      • Wimmera, Mark Brandi (Hachette, Hachette Australia)

       

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      Small Publishers’ Adult Book of the Year

      • Atlantic Black, A. S. Patric (Transit Lounge, Transit Lounge)
      • Call of the Reed Warbler – A New Agriculture – A New Earth, Charles Massy (The University of Queensland Press, The University of Queensland Press)
      • Cardinal, Louise Milligan (Melbourne University Press, Melbourne University Publishing)
      • Journeys into the Wild: The Photography of Peter Dombrovskis, Introduction & Commentary by Bob Brown (NLA Publishing, National Library of Australia)
      • The Australian Bird Guide, Peter Menkhorst, Danny Rogers, Rohan Clarke, Jeff Davies, Peter Marsack and Kim Franklin (CSIRO Publishing, CSIRO Publishing)
      • The Restorer, Michael Sala (Text Publishing, Text Publishing)
      • Museum of Words, Georgia Blain (Scribe Publications, Scribe Publications)
      • Mirror Sydney, Vanessa Berry (Giramondo Publishing, Giramondo Publishing Company)

       

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      Small Publishers’ Children’s Book of the Year

      • At the Beach I See, Kamsani Bin Salleh (Magabala Books, Magabala Books)
      • At the Zoo I See, Joshua Button and Robyn Wells (Magabala Books, Magabala Books)
      • Big Fella Rain, Beryl Webber and illustrated by Fern Martins (Magabala Books, Magabala Books)
      • Hello, Melbourne!, Megan McKean (Thames & Hudson Australia, Thames & Hudson Australia)
      • It’s OK to Feel the Way You Do, Josh Langley (Big Sky Publishing, Big Sky Publishing)
      • The Elephant, Peter Carnavas (The University of Queensland Press, The University of Queensland Press)
      • Slow Down, World, Tai Snaith (Thames & Hudson Australia, Thames & Hudson Australia)
      • Under the Love Umbrella, Davina Bell and Allison Colpoys (Scribble Kids’ Books, Scribe Publications)

       

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      The Matt Richell Award for New Writer of the Year

      • Australia Day, Melanie Cheng (Text Publishing, Text Publishing)
      • Nevermoor, Jessica Townsend (Lothian Children’s Books, Hachette Australia)
      • See What I Have Done, Sarah Schmidt (Hachette, Hachette Australia)
      • Terra Nullius, Claire G Coleman (Hachette, Hachette Australia)
      • The Inaugural Meeting Of The Fairvale Ladies Book Club, Sophie Green (Hachette, Hachette Australia)
      • The Girl from Munich, Tania Blanchard (Simon & Schuster Australia, Simon & Schuster Australia)
      • The Last Man in Europe: A Novel, Dennis Glover (Black Inc., Black Inc. Books)
      • The Trauma Cleaner: One Woman’s Extraordinary Life in Death, Decay & Disaster, Sarah Krasnostein (Text Publishing, Text Publishing)
      • Wimmera, Mark Brandi (Hachette, Hachette Australia)

       

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      Book of the Year for Older Children (ages 13+)

      • Beautiful Mess, Claire Christian (Text Publishing, Text Publishing)
      • Begin, End, Begin: A #LoveOzYA Anthology, Amie Kaufman, Melissa Keil, Will Kostakis, Ellie Marney, Jaclyn Moriarty, Michael Pryor, Alice Pung, Gabrielle Tozer, Lili Wilkinson and Danielle Binks (HarperCollins Publishers, HarperCollins Publishers)
      • Frogkisser!, Garth Nix (Allen & Unwin, Allen & Unwin)
      • My Life as a Hashtag, Gabrielle Williams (Allen & Unwin, Allen & Unwin)
      • Take Three Girls, Simmone Howell, Cath Crowley and Fiona Wood (Pan Australia, Pan Macmillan Australia)
      • Tales From a Tall Forest, Shaun Micallef and illustrated by Jonathan Bentley (Hardie Grant Egmont, Hardie Grant Egmont)
      • The Silent Invasion, James Bradley (Pan Australia, Pan Macmillan Australia)
      • Untidy Towns, Kate O’Donnell (The University of Queensland Press, The University of Queensland Press)

       

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      Book of the Year for Younger Children (ages 7-12)

      • Frankie Fish and the Sonic Suitcase, Peter Helliar and illustrated by Lesley Vamos (Hardie Grant Egmont, Hardie Grant Egmont)
      • Funny Kid for President, Matt Stanton (ABC Books, HarperCollins Publishers)
      • Maybe, Morris Gleitzman (Viking – AU YR, Penguin Random House Australia)
      • Nevermoor, Jessica Townsend (Lothian Children’s Books, Hachette Australia)
      • Polly and Buster: The Wayward Witch and the Feelings Monster, Sally Rippin (Hardie Grant Egmont, Hardie Grant Egmont)
      • The Bad Guys Episode 6, Aaron Blabey (Scholastic Press, Scholastic Australia)
      • The Extremely Inconvenient Adventures of Bronte Mettlestone, Jaclyn Moriarty (Allen & Unwin, Allen & Unwin)
      • The Girl, the Dog and the Writer in Rome, Katrina Nannestad (ABC Books, HarperCollins Publishers)
      • The 91-Storey Treehouse, Andy Griffiths and Terry Denton (Pan Australia, Pan Macmillan Australia)

       

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      Children’s Picture Book of the Year (ages 0-6)

      • Do Not Lick This Book, Idan Ben-Barak and illustrated by Julian Frost (Allen & Unwin, Allen & Unwin)
      • Florette, Anna Walker (Viking – AU YR, Penguin Random House Australia)
      • I Just Ate My Friend, Heidi McKinnon (Allen & Unwin, Allen & Unwin)
      • I’m Australian Too, Mem Fox and illustrated by Ronojoy Ghosh (Scholastic Press, Scholastic Australia)
      • Mopoke, Philip Bunting (Scholastic Press, Scholastic Australia)
      • Pig the Star, Aaron Blabey (Scholastic Press, Scholastic Australia)
      • No One Likes a Fart, Zoë Foster Blake (Viking – AU YR, Penguin Random House Australia)
      • The Bum Book, Kate Mayes and illustrated by Andrew Joyner (ABC Books, HarperCollins Publishers)
      • The Very Noisy Baby, Alison Lester (Affirm Press, Affirm Press)

      Longlist Announced for the 2018 Inky Awards

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      We’re so excited to be able to share the 2018 Inky Awards longlist with you!

      The longlist of 10 Australian and 10 international YA titles was selected by a panel of past Inky Awards judges, the Dog’s Advisory Board and Inside a Dog alumni, all young readers aged between 12 and 20 years.

      The 2018 Inky Awards Longlists are:

      Gold Inky Award - Australian titles

      • Begin, End, Begin: A #LoveOzYA Anthology edited by Danielle Binks 
      • In the Dark Spaces by Cally Black
      • Take Three Girls by Cath Crowley, Simmone Howell & Fiona Wood
      • Beautiful Mess by Claire Christian
      • Ida by Alison Evans
      • Wreck by Fleur Ferris
      • A Shadow’s Breath by Nicole Hayes
      • Remind Me How This Ends by Gabrielle Tozer
      • Paper Cranes Don’t Fly by Peter Vu  
      • Ballad for a Mad Girl by Vikki Wakefield

      Silver Inky Award - International titles

      • The Upside of Unrequited by Becky Albertalli
      • Turtles All The Way Down by John Green
      • The Loneliest Girl in the Universe by Lauren James
      • Still Life with Tornado by A.S. King
      • The Gentleman’s Guide to Vice and Virtue by Mackenzi Lee
      • Genuine Fraud by E. Lockhart
      • Warcross by Marie Lu
      • One of Us is Lying by Karen M. McManus
      • Release by Patrick Ness
      • The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas

       

      But they need you to make this year’s Inky Awards the biggest one ever!

      But how can you get involved?

      Wanted: 2018 Inky Awards Judges

      Applications are now open for the 2018 Inky Awards judging panel. Judges should be between 12 and 18 years old, live in Australia, and – above all – love books and reading!

      If you are a bookish teen or have a bookish teen in your life, please encourage them to apply! Applications close at 9am AEST on Monday 26 March.

      Wanted: 2018 Shadow Judges

      Applications are also open for the inaugural Inky Awards Shadow Judges. These teens will be sent five of the longlist titles to read, react and/or review for the new Inside a Dog website (to be launched very soon.) Applications close at 9am AEST on Monday 26 March.

      You can apply for both programs.