2019 Stella Prize Shortlist Announced

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2019 Stella Prize shortlist of extraordinary books by Australian women

The six books are concerned with the most important questions of how to live now, and writers demonstrate first-rate critical thinking capabilities, tremendous imagination and a readiness to take risks with form.

Louise Swinn, Chair of the 2019 Judging Panel, says:

“The six finalists on the 2019 Stella Prize shortlist explode the myth of the death of the book, and they are a hearty response to the under-representation of women’s work in awards. This is an incredibly diverse knot of books, with broad subjects showing that identity is shaped across many continents and informed by many cultures. Non-fiction and fiction works stray from their formal constraints as authors give authentic voices to those who are otherwise under-represented. The books on this shortlist inform and entertain, and while they speak absolutely to our moment, their insights are timeless.”

ABIA 2019 Longlist Announced

The Australian Publishers Association has announced the longlist for the 2019 Australian Book Industry Awards (ABIAs).
The longlist introduces the titles, publishers and authors in contention for a coveted 2019 ABIA.

Voted for by the ABIA Academy — a group of more than 250 publishers, booksellers, agents, media and industry representatives — have selected books published in 2018 across 12 categories.  

BIOGRAPHY BOOK OF THE YEAR:    Back, After the Break, Osher Günsberg (HarperCollins Publishers, HarperCollins Publishers)   Butterfly on a Pin: A memoir of love, despair and reinvention , Alannah Hill (Hardie Grant Publishing, Hardie Grant Books)   Challenge Accepted!, Celeste Barber (HarperCollins Publishers, HarperCollins Publishers)   Eggshell Skull,  Bri Lee (Allen & Unwin, Allen & Unwin)   Johnathan Thurston: The Autobiography , Johnathan Thurston, with James Phelps (HarperCollins Publishers, HarperCollins Publishers)   One Hundred Years of Dirt, Rick Morton (Melbourne University Publishing, Melbourne University Press)   Speaking Up,  Gillian Triggs (Melbourne University Publishing, Melbourne University Press)   Teacher , Gabbie Stroud (Allen & Unwin, Allen & Unwin)

BIOGRAPHY BOOK OF THE YEAR:

Back, After the Break,Osher Günsberg (HarperCollins Publishers, HarperCollins Publishers)

Butterfly on a Pin: A memoir of love, despair and reinvention, Alannah Hill (Hardie Grant Publishing, Hardie Grant Books)

Challenge Accepted!,Celeste Barber (HarperCollins Publishers, HarperCollins Publishers)

Eggshell Skull, Bri Lee (Allen & Unwin, Allen & Unwin)

Johnathan Thurston: The Autobiography, Johnathan Thurston, with James Phelps (HarperCollins Publishers, HarperCollins Publishers)

One Hundred Years of Dirt,Rick Morton (Melbourne University Publishing, Melbourne University Press)

Speaking Up, Gillian Triggs (Melbourne University Publishing, Melbourne University Press)

Teacher, Gabbie Stroud (Allen & Unwin, Allen & Unwin)

BOOK OF THE YEAR FOR OLDER CHILDREN (AGES 13+):    Amelia Westlake , Erin Gough (Hardie Grant Egmont, Hardie Grant Egmont)   Between Us , Clare Atkins (Black Inc. Books, Black Inc.)   Catching Teller Crow , Ambelin Kwaymullina and Ezekiel Kwaymullina (Allen & Unwin, Allen & Unwin)   Hive , A. J. Betts (Pan Macmillan Australia, Pan Australia)   Jane Doe and the Cradle of All Worlds,  Jeremy Lachlan(Hardie Grant Egmont, Hardie Grant Egmont)   P is for Pearl,  Eliza Henry-Jones (HarperCollins Publishers, Angus & Robertson)   Small Spaces , Sarah Epstein (Walker Books Australia, Walker Books Australia)   Tales from the Inner City,  Shaun Tan (Allen & Unwin, Allen & Unwin)

BOOK OF THE YEAR FOR OLDER CHILDREN (AGES 13+):

Amelia Westlake, Erin Gough (Hardie Grant Egmont, Hardie Grant Egmont)

Between Us, Clare Atkins (Black Inc. Books, Black Inc.)

Catching Teller Crow, Ambelin Kwaymullina and Ezekiel Kwaymullina (Allen & Unwin, Allen & Unwin)

Hive, A. J. Betts (Pan Macmillan Australia, Pan Australia)

Jane Doe and the Cradle of All Worlds, Jeremy Lachlan(Hardie Grant Egmont, Hardie Grant Egmont)

P is for Pearl, Eliza Henry-Jones (HarperCollins Publishers, Angus & Robertson)

Small Spaces, Sarah Epstein (Walker Books Australia, Walker Books Australia)

Tales from the Inner City, Shaun Tan (Allen & Unwin, Allen & Unwin)

BOOK OF THE YEAR FOR YOUNGER CHILDREN (AGES 7-12):    Lenny’s Book of Everything,  Karen Foxlee (Allen & Unwin, Allen & Unwin)   Ninja Kid #1 , Anh Do and Jeremy Ley (Scholastic Australia, Scholastic Press)   Polly and Buster: The Mystery of the Magic Stones,   Sally Rippin (Hardie Grant Egmont, Hardie Grant Egmont)   Real Pigeons Fight Crime , Andrew McDonald & Ben Wood (Hardie Grant Egmont, Hardie Grant Egmont)   The 104-Storey Treehouse,  Andy Griffiths, Terry Denton (Pan Macmillan Australia, Macmillan Australia)   The Bad Guys Episode 7: Do-You-Think-He-Saurus? !, Aaron Blabey (Scholastic Australia, Scholastic Press)   The Tales of Mr Walker,   Jess Black and Sara Acton (Penguin Random House Australia, Puffin)   Wundersmith: The Calling of Morrigan Crow: Nevermoor 2 ,  Jessica Townsend (Hachette Australia Pty Ltd, Lothian Children’s Books)

BOOK OF THE YEAR FOR YOUNGER CHILDREN (AGES 7-12):

Lenny’s Book of Everything, Karen Foxlee (Allen & Unwin, Allen & Unwin)

Ninja Kid #1, Anh Do and Jeremy Ley (Scholastic Australia, Scholastic Press)

Polly and Buster: The Mystery of the Magic Stones,  Sally Rippin (Hardie Grant Egmont, Hardie Grant Egmont)

Real Pigeons Fight Crime, Andrew McDonald & Ben Wood (Hardie Grant Egmont, Hardie Grant Egmont)

The 104-Storey Treehouse, Andy Griffiths, Terry Denton (Pan Macmillan Australia, Macmillan Australia)

The Bad Guys Episode 7: Do-You-Think-He-Saurus?!, Aaron Blabey (Scholastic Australia, Scholastic Press)

The Tales of Mr Walker,  Jess Black and Sara Acton (Penguin Random House Australia, Puffin)

Wundersmith: The Calling of Morrigan Crow: Nevermoor 2,  Jessica Townsend (Hachette Australia Pty Ltd, Lothian Children’s Books)

CHILDREN’S PICTURE BOOK OF THE YEAR (AGES 0-7):    All the Ways to be Smart,  Davina Bell and Allison Colpoys (Scribe Publications, Scribble Kids’ Books)   Cicada , Shaun Tan (Hachette Australia Pty Ltd, Lothian Children’s Books)   Claris: The Chicest Mouse in Paris , Megan Hess (Hardie Grant Egmont, Hardie Grant Egmont)   Go Go and the Silver Shoes , Jane Godwin and Anna Walker (Penguin Random House Australia, Viking)   If I Was Prime Minister,  Beck and Robin Feiner(HarperCollins Publishers, ABC Books)   Love Makes a Family , Sophie Beer (Hardie Grant Egmont, Little Hare Books)   Macca the Alpaca,  Matt Cosgrove (Scholastic Australia, Koala Books)   Pig the Grub,  Aaron Blabey (Scholastic Australia, Scholastic Press)

CHILDREN’S PICTURE BOOK OF THE YEAR (AGES 0-7):

All the Ways to be Smart, Davina Bell and Allison Colpoys (Scribe Publications, Scribble Kids’ Books)

Cicada, Shaun Tan (Hachette Australia Pty Ltd, Lothian Children’s Books)

Claris: The Chicest Mouse in Paris, Megan Hess (Hardie Grant Egmont, Hardie Grant Egmont)

Go Go and the Silver Shoes, Jane Godwin and Anna Walker (Penguin Random House Australia, Viking)

If I Was Prime Minister, Beck and Robin Feiner(HarperCollins Publishers, ABC Books)

Love Makes a Family, Sophie Beer (Hardie Grant Egmont, Little Hare Books)

Macca the Alpaca, Matt Cosgrove (Scholastic Australia, Koala Books)

Pig the Grub, Aaron Blabey (Scholastic Australia, Scholastic Press)

GENERAL FICTION BOOK OF THE YEAR:    Nine Perfect Strangers, Liane Moriarty (Pan Macmillan Australia, Macmillan Australia)   Scrublands , Chris Hammer (Allen & Unwin, Allen & Unwin)   The Lost Flowers of Alice Hart,  Holly Ringland (HarperCollins Publishers, Fourth Estate)   The Lost Man,  Jane Harper (Pan Macmillan Australia, Macmillan Australia)   The Nowhere Child , Christian White (Affirm Press)   The Other Wife,  Michael Robotham (Hachette Australia Pty Ltd, Hachette Australia)   The Rúin , Dervla McTiernan (HarperCollins Publishers, HarperCollins Publishers)   The Tattooist of Auschwitz , Heather Morris (Echo Publishing, Echo Publishing)

GENERAL FICTION BOOK OF THE YEAR:

Nine Perfect Strangers,Liane Moriarty (Pan Macmillan Australia, Macmillan Australia)

Scrublands, Chris Hammer (Allen & Unwin, Allen & Unwin)

The Lost Flowers of Alice Hart, Holly Ringland (HarperCollins Publishers, Fourth Estate)

The Lost Man, Jane Harper (Pan Macmillan Australia, Macmillan Australia)

The Nowhere Child, Christian White (Affirm Press)

The Other Wife, Michael Robotham (Hachette Australia Pty Ltd, Hachette Australia)

The Rúin, Dervla McTiernan (HarperCollins Publishers, HarperCollins Publishers)

The Tattooist of Auschwitz, Heather Morris (Echo Publishing, Echo Publishing)

GENERAL NON-FICTION BOOK OF THE YEAR:    Any Ordinary Day,  Leigh Sales (Penguin Random House Australia, Hamish Hamilton)   Boys Will Be Boys , Clementine Ford (Allen & Unwin, Allen & Unwin)   Dear Santa , Samuel Johnson (Hachette Australia Pty Ltd, Hachette Australia)   No Friend But the Mountains: Writing from Manus Prison,  Behrouz Boochani, Omid Tofighian (translator) (Pan Macmillan Australia, Picador Australia)   The Arsonist , Chloe Hooper (Penguin Random House Australia, Hamish Hamilton)   The Land Before Avocado , Richard Glover (HarperCollins Publishers, ABC Books)   Welcome to Country: A Travel Guide to Indigenous Australia , Marcia Langton (Hardie Grant Publishing, Hardie Grant Travel)   Woo’s Wonderful World of Maths , Eddie Woo (Pan Macmillan Australia, Macmillan Australia)

GENERAL NON-FICTION BOOK OF THE YEAR:

Any Ordinary Day, Leigh Sales (Penguin Random House Australia, Hamish Hamilton)

Boys Will Be Boys, Clementine Ford (Allen & Unwin, Allen & Unwin)

Dear Santa, Samuel Johnson (Hachette Australia Pty Ltd, Hachette Australia)

No Friend But the Mountains: Writing from Manus Prison, Behrouz Boochani, Omid Tofighian (translator) (Pan Macmillan Australia, Picador Australia)

The Arsonist, Chloe Hooper (Penguin Random House Australia, Hamish Hamilton)

The Land Before Avocado, Richard Glover (HarperCollins Publishers, ABC Books)

Welcome to Country: A Travel Guide to Indigenous Australia, Marcia Langton (Hardie Grant Publishing, Hardie Grant Travel)

Woo’s Wonderful World of Maths, Eddie Woo (Pan Macmillan Australia, Macmillan Australia)

ILLUSTRATED BOOK OF THE YEAR:    A Painted Landscape: Across Australia from Bush to Coast , Amber Creswell Bell (Thames & Hudson Australia, Thames & Hudson Australia)   Chromatopia: An Illustrated History of Colour,  David Coles (Thames & Hudson Australia, Thames & Hudson Australia)   Family: New vegetable classics to comfort and nourish,  Hetty McKinnon (Pan Macmillan Australia, Plum)   Flour and Stone: Baked for Love, Life & Happiness, Nadine Ingram with photography by Alan Benson (Simon & Schuster Australia, Julie Gibbs for Simon & Schuster Australia)   Mirka & Georges,  Lesley Harding & Kendrah Morgan (Melbourne University Publishing, Melbourne University Press)   Resident Dog: Incredible Homes and the Dogs That Live There , Nicole England (Thames & Hudson Australia, Thames & Hudson Australia)   Special Guest,  Annabel Crabb and Wendy Sharpe (Murdoch Books, Murdoch Books)   The Cook’s Apprentice , Stephanie Alexander (Penguin Random House Australia, Lantern)

ILLUSTRATED BOOK OF THE YEAR:

A Painted Landscape: Across Australia from Bush to Coast, Amber Creswell Bell (Thames & Hudson Australia, Thames & Hudson Australia)

Chromatopia: An Illustrated History of Colour, David Coles (Thames & Hudson Australia, Thames & Hudson Australia)

Family: New vegetable classics to comfort and nourish, Hetty McKinnon (Pan Macmillan Australia, Plum)

Flour and Stone: Baked for Love, Life & Happiness,Nadine Ingram with photography by Alan Benson (Simon & Schuster Australia, Julie Gibbs for Simon & Schuster Australia)

Mirka & Georges, Lesley Harding & Kendrah Morgan (Melbourne University Publishing, Melbourne University Press)

Resident Dog: Incredible Homes and the Dogs That Live There, Nicole England (Thames & Hudson Australia, Thames & Hudson Australia)

Special Guest, Annabel Crabb and Wendy Sharpe (Murdoch Books, Murdoch Books)

The Cook’s Apprentice, Stephanie Alexander (Penguin Random House Australia, Lantern)

INTERNATIONAL BOOK OF THE YEAR:    Becoming,  Michelle Obama (Penguin Random House Australia, Viking)   CIRCE , Madeline Miller (Bloomsbury Publishing, Bloomsbury)   Fear: Trump in the White House , Bob Woodward (Simon & Schuster UK, Simon & Schuster UK)   Less , Andrew Sean Greer (Hachette Australia Pty Ltd, Abacus)   Lost Connections,  Johann Hari (Bloomsbury Publishing, Bloomsbury Circus)   Milkman , Anna Burns (Faber & Faber, Faber & Faber)   Normal People , Sally Rooney (Faber & Faber, Faber & Faber)   Ottolenghi SIMPLE , Yotam Ottolenghi (Penguin Random House Australia, Ebury Press)

INTERNATIONAL BOOK OF THE YEAR:

Becoming, Michelle Obama (Penguin Random House Australia, Viking)

CIRCE, Madeline Miller (Bloomsbury Publishing, Bloomsbury)

Fear: Trump in the White House, Bob Woodward (Simon & Schuster UK, Simon & Schuster UK)

Less, Andrew Sean Greer (Hachette Australia Pty Ltd, Abacus)

Lost Connections, Johann Hari (Bloomsbury Publishing, Bloomsbury Circus)

Milkman, Anna Burns (Faber & Faber, Faber & Faber)

Normal People, Sally Rooney (Faber & Faber, Faber & Faber)

Ottolenghi SIMPLE, Yotam Ottolenghi (Penguin Random House Australia, Ebury Press)

LITERARY BOOK OF THE YEAR:    Boy Swallows Universe, Trent Dalton (HarperCollins Publishers, Fourth Estate)   Bridge of Clay,  Markus Zusak (Pan Macmillan Australia, Picador Australia)   In the Garden of the Fugitives,  Ceridwen Dovey (Penguin Random House Australia, Hamish Hamilton)   Shell , Kristina Olsson (Simon & Schuster Australia, Scribner Australia)   The Children’s House , Alice Nelson (Penguin Random House Australia, Vintage Australia)   The Shepherd’s Hut , Tim Winton (Penguin Random House Australia, Hamish Hamilton)   Too Much Lip,  Melissa Lucashenko (The University of Queensland Press, UQP)   Wintering,  Krissy Kneen (Text Publishing, Text Publishing)

LITERARY BOOK OF THE YEAR:

Boy Swallows Universe,Trent Dalton (HarperCollins Publishers, Fourth Estate)

Bridge of Clay, Markus Zusak (Pan Macmillan Australia, Picador Australia)

In the Garden of the Fugitives, Ceridwen Dovey (Penguin Random House Australia, Hamish Hamilton)

Shell, Kristina Olsson (Simon & Schuster Australia, Scribner Australia)

The Children’s House, Alice Nelson (Penguin Random House Australia, Vintage Australia)

The Shepherd’s Hut, Tim Winton (Penguin Random House Australia, Hamish Hamilton)

Too Much Lip, Melissa Lucashenko (The University of Queensland Press, UQP)

Wintering, Krissy Kneen (Text Publishing, Text Publishing)

SMALL PUBLISHERS’ ADULT BOOK OF THE YEAR:    A Superior Spectre, Angela Meyer (Ventura Press, Peter Bishop Books)   Blakwork , Alison Whittaker (Magabala Books, Magabala Books Aboriginal Corporation)   Deep Time Dreaming , Billy Griffiths (Black Inc. Books, Black Inc.)   Growing Up Aboriginal in Australia , Dr Anita Heiss (ed.) (Black Inc Books, Black Inc.)   The Bookshop of the Broken Hearted , Robert Hillman (Text Publishing, Text Publishing)   The Geography of Friendship , Sally Piper (The University of Queensland Press, UQP)   The Western Front Diaries of Charles Bean , Edited by Peter Burness (UNSW Press, published in association with the Australian War Memorial, NewSouth)   Wild Sea: A History of the Southern Ocean,  Joy McCann (UNSW Press, NewSouth)

SMALL PUBLISHERS’ ADULT BOOK OF THE YEAR:

A Superior Spectre,Angela Meyer (Ventura Press, Peter Bishop Books)

Blakwork, Alison Whittaker (Magabala Books, Magabala Books Aboriginal Corporation)

Deep Time Dreaming, Billy Griffiths (Black Inc. Books, Black Inc.)

Growing Up Aboriginal in Australia, Dr Anita Heiss (ed.) (Black Inc Books, Black Inc.)

The Bookshop of the Broken Hearted, Robert Hillman (Text Publishing, Text Publishing)

The Geography of Friendship, Sally Piper (The University of Queensland Press, UQP)

The Western Front Diaries of Charles Bean, Edited by Peter Burness (UNSW Press, published in association with the Australian War Memorial, NewSouth)

Wild Sea: A History of the Southern Ocean, Joy McCann (UNSW Press, NewSouth)

SMALL PUBLISHERS’ CHILDREN’S BOOK OF THE YEAR:    Alfred’s War,  Rachel Bin Salleh and Samantha Fry (Magabala Books, Magabala Books Aboriginal Corporation)   Black Cockatoo,  Carl Merrison and Hakea Hustler (Magabala Books, Magabala Books Aboriginal Corporation)   Empty,  Andrew Pratley, Angel McMullan(New Frontier Publishing, Little Steps Publishing)   Heads And Tails: Insects, John Canty (author/illustrator), (Berbay Publishing, Berbay Publishing)   I Had Such Friends,  Meg Gatland-Veness (Pantera Press, Pantera Press)   Night Walk,  Alison Binks (writer and illustrator), (Berbay Publishing, Berbay Publishing)   Rhyme Cordial,  Antonia Pesenti (Scribe Publications, Scribble Kids’ Books)   The Extremely Weird Thing that Happened in Huggabie Falls,  Adam Cece (illustrated by Andrew Weldon) (Text Publishing, Text Publishing)   Whisper,  Lynette Noni (Pantera Press, Pantera Press)

SMALL PUBLISHERS’ CHILDREN’S BOOK OF THE YEAR:

Alfred’s War, Rachel Bin Salleh and Samantha Fry (Magabala Books, Magabala Books Aboriginal Corporation)

Black Cockatoo, Carl Merrison and Hakea Hustler (Magabala Books, Magabala Books Aboriginal Corporation)

Empty, Andrew Pratley, Angel McMullan(New Frontier Publishing, Little Steps Publishing)

Heads And Tails: Insects,John Canty (author/illustrator), (Berbay Publishing, Berbay Publishing)

I Had Such Friends, Meg Gatland-Veness (Pantera Press, Pantera Press)

Night Walk, Alison Binks (writer and illustrator), (Berbay Publishing, Berbay Publishing)

Rhyme Cordial, Antonia Pesenti (Scribe Publications, Scribble Kids’ Books)

The Extremely Weird Thing that Happened in Huggabie Falls, Adam Cece (illustrated by Andrew Weldon) (Text Publishing, Text Publishing)

Whisper, Lynette Noni (Pantera Press, Pantera Press)

THE MATT RICHELL AWARD FOR NEW WRITER OF THE YEAR:    Boy Swallows Universe,  Trent Dalton (HarperCollins Publishers, Fourth Estate)   The Nowhere Child,  Christian White (Affirm Press, -)   Eggshell Skull,  Bri Lee (Allen & Unwin, Allen & Unwin)   One Hundred Years of Dirt,  Rick Morton (Melbourne University Publishing, Melbourne University Press)   Teacher , Gabbie Stroud (Allen & Unwin, Allen & Unwin)   The Lost Flowers of Alice Hart,  Holly Ringland (HarperCollins Publishers, Fourth Estate)   The Rúin,   Dervla McTiernan (HarperCollins Publishers, HarperCollins Publishers)   The Tattooist of Auschwitz , Heather Morris (Echo Publishing, Echo Publishing)

THE MATT RICHELL AWARD FOR NEW WRITER OF THE YEAR:

Boy Swallows Universe, Trent Dalton (HarperCollins Publishers, Fourth Estate)

The Nowhere Child, Christian White (Affirm Press, -)

Eggshell Skull, Bri Lee (Allen & Unwin, Allen & Unwin)

One Hundred Years of Dirt, Rick Morton (Melbourne University Publishing, Melbourne University Press)

Teacher, Gabbie Stroud (Allen & Unwin, Allen & Unwin)

The Lost Flowers of Alice Hart, Holly Ringland (HarperCollins Publishers, Fourth Estate)

The Rúin,  Dervla McTiernan (HarperCollins Publishers, HarperCollins Publishers)

The Tattooist of Auschwitz, Heather Morris (Echo Publishing, Echo Publishing)

Walter Scott Prize Longlist Announced

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The Walter Scott Prize for Historical Fiction, now in its tenth year, has just announced the 2019 Longlist.

The Longlist of twelve is:

Little by Edward Carey (Gallic Books)

A Long Way From Home by Peter Carey (Faber)

After The Party by Cressida Connolly (Viking)

Washington Black by Esi Edugyan (Serpent’s Tail)

The Western Wind by Samantha Harvey (Jonathan Cape)

Dark Water by Elizabeth Lowry (riverrun)

Now We Shall Be Entirely Free by Andrew Miller (Sceptre)

Warlight by Michael Ondaatje (Jonathan Cape)

The Wanderers by Tim Pears (Bloomsbury)

The Long Take by Robin Robertson (Picador)

All The Lives We Never Lived by Anuradha Roy (Maclehose Press)

Tombland by C J Sansom (Mantle)

The Judges said:

“Since its founding in 2009, the Walter Scott Prize has grown in standing and is now a trusted kitemark for the very best historical fiction from the UK and Ireland, as well as a platform from which to introduce exciting voices from the Commonwealth.

“Our tenth longlist features wonderful stories from both the recent and distant past, with diverse settings; from jostling cities and insular villages to vast open spaces and wild oceans. We meet some unforgettable characters – an Australian long-distance rally driver; a diminutive Swiss orphan who becomes Madame Tussaud; a middle-class English housewife caught up in Oswald Mosley’s fascist movement; a young man ‘freed’ from slavery on a journey across the globe. Choosing a shortlist from these corkers is going to be a tough task for the judges.”

Women's Prize for Fiction 2019 Longlist Announced

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The Women’s Prize for Fiction is one of the most respected, most celebrated and most successful literary awards in the world. An annual award, it celebrates the very best full length fiction written by women throughout the world. Through the initiatives and promotions set up by the WPFF, even appearing on the shortlist significantly boosts a novel’s sales and ensures an author’s work will be promoted in bookshops and libraries all over the world.

This year’s sixteen longlisted books span both new and well-established writers and a range of genres, including seven debut novels.

The 2019 longlist is:

The Silence of the Girls by Pat Barker
Remembered by Yvonne Battle-Felton
My Sister, the Serial Killer by Oyinkan Braithwaite
The Pisces by Melissa Broder
Milkman by Anna Burns
Freshwater  by Akwaeke Emezi
Ordinary People by Diana Evans
Swan Song Kelleigh by Greenberg-Jephcott
An American Marriage by Tayari Jones
Number One Chinese by Restaurant Lillian Li
Bottled Goods by Sophie van Llewyn
Lost Children by Archive Valeria Luiselli
Praise Song for the Butterflies by Bernice L. McFadden
Circe by Madeline Miller
Ghost Wall by Sarah Moss
Normal People by Sally Rooney

Australian Indie Book Awards 2019 Shortlist Announced

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Celebrating Australian literary talent

The Australian Indie Book Awards recognise and reward the best Australian writing as chosen by Australian Independent Booksellers.
The Awards celebrate the enormous depth and range of literary talent in this nation. 

Each November, booksellers, members of Leading Edge Books group of independent bookstores are invited to submit their bookshop’s favourite titles of a calendar year. Titles must be published in original edition between 1 January and 31 December and are entirely authored and illustrated by current Australian citizens and permanent residents.
A Longlist of titles is compiled and announced in December and a Shortlist of 24 titles (4 titles per category) are announced in late January.
The shortlisted titles are reviewed by an independent judging panel made up of representatives from bookstores and a Leading Edge Books Head Office staff member.  A winner is chosen in each category, then an overall Book of the Year winner voted on from the six category winners.  

The 2019 shortlist is comprised of titles from the following categories:


Fiction

The Lost Man by Jane Harper (Macmillan Australia)

Shell by Kristina Olsson (Scribner Australia)

The Shepherd's Hut by Tim Winton (Penguin Random House Australia)

Bridge of Clay by Markus Zusak (Picador Australia)

Non-Fiction

The Land Before Avocado by Richard Glover (ABC Books, HarperCollins Australia)

The Arsonist by Chloe Hooper (Penguin Random House Australia)

Eggshell Skull by Bri Lee (Allen & Unwin)

Any Ordinary Day by Leigh Sales (Penguin Random House Australia)

Debut Fiction

Boy Swallows Universe by Trent Dalton (HarperCollins Australia)

Scrublands by Chris Hammer (Allen & Unwin)

The Tattooist of Auschwitz by Heather Morris (Echo Publishing)

The Nowhere Child by Christian White (Affirm Press)

Illustrated Non-Fiction

A Painted Landscape: Across Australia from Bush to Coast by Amber Creswell Bell (Thames & Hudson Australia)

Marcia Langton: Welcome to Country by Marcia Langton (Hardie Grant Travel)

Family: New Vegetable Classics to Comfort and Nourish by Hetty McKinnon (Plum)

Australian Dreamscapes by Claire Takacs (Hardie Grant Books)

Children's (up to 12yrs)

All the Ways to be Smart by Davina Bell & Allison Colpoys (Illus) (Scribe Publications)

Lenny's Book of Everything by Karen Foxlee (Allen & Unwin)

Tales from the Inner City by Shaun Tan (Allen & Unwin)

Wundersmith: The Calling of Morrigan Crow by Jessica Townsend (Hachette Australia)

Young Adult (12yrs+)

Hive by A. J. Betts (Pan Australia)

Amelia Westlake by Erin Gough (Hardie Grant Egmont)

A Song Only I Can Hear by Barry Jonsberg (Allen & Unwin)

Catching Teller Crow by Ambelin Kwaymullina & Ezekiel Kwaymullina (Allen & Unwin)

2019 Stella Prize Longlist Announced

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The $50,000 Stella Prize celebrates literature penned by Australian women. First awarded in 2013, the Stella Prize is named for ‘My Brilliant Career’ author Stella Maria Sarah ‘Miles’ Franklin, and has become a landmark prize in the Australian literary scene. This year, some 170 entries were narrowed down to just twelve.

In this years Stella Prize longlist, the twelve books cover sexual assault, arson and its consequences, parental neglect, issues of mental health, dysfunctional and complicated family life, chronic illness, and inherited pain.
Each is concerned with the most important questions of how to live now, and writers demonstrate first-rate critical thinking capabilities, tremendous imagination, and a readiness to take risks with form.

Read more about the Stella Prize here - https://thestellaprize.com.au/

Judges' report

Reading for the Stella Prize means reading most of the books by Australian women published in 2018 – it’s a sample of the zeitgeist, a look at what is informing our thinking right now, and it has been an honour. The overall quality of submissions this year was outstanding. In looking to award a work of literature that is excellent, original and engaging, we found many genuine contenders for the prize this year and narrowing down to twelve has been a considerable challenge – a testament to the health of women’s writing today.

It feels like a big year for fiction, and our longlist reflects this. As well as some strong debuts, it was reassuring to see so many books from writers whose work we have admired for some time. Family relations and the persistence of the past in the present continue to inspire writers, and several books were concerned with the aftermath of trauma, especially sexual violence. Realism continues to dominate Australian fiction, with a few standout departures into other modes.

We wished for more representations of otherness and diversity from publishers: narratives from outside Australia, from and featuring women of colour, LGBTQIA stories, Indigenous stories, more subversion, more difference.

Notwithstanding this, we found a great deal to admire, and rediscovered the joy of reading anew every time we found a surprise.

Ultimately, we chose books that strove for something big and fulfilled their own ambitions. We fell in love with some curious and funny narratives, some dark and intellectual stories, some lyrical and poetic observations, some youthful wisdom, and the audacious frivolity of age. This longlist has humour but is never frivolous – all the books are of a high calibre, showing first-rate critical thinking capabilities, and tremendous imagination. We were educated and entertained by writers of all ages, and each of the writers here managed to delight us. These are all artists concerned with the most important questions of our age and how to live now, and it has been a pleasure to be in their company.

Anna Burns' Milkman wins the 2018 Man Booker Prize

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Anna Burns’ third novel ‘Milkman’ has won the 2018 Man Booker Prize.
The Man Booker Prize, celebrating its 50th anniversary, is worth around $66,000 and Burns is the first writer from Northern Ireland to have be awarded.

In an interview posted by the Man Booker Prize foundation, Burns said that ‘Milkman’ was inspired by her own experience. “I grew up in a place that was rife with violence, distrust and paranoia, and peopled by individuals trying to navigate and survive in that world as best as they could.”

Set in an un-named city but with an astonishing, breath-shorteningly palpable sense of time and place ‘Milkman’ is a tale of gossip and hearsay, silence and deliberate deafness. The story of inaction with enormous consequences and decisions that are never made, but for which people are judged and punished. Middle sister is our protagonist. She is busy attempting to keep her mother from discovering her nearly-boyfriend and to keep everyone in the dark about her encounter with milkman (which she herself for the life of her cannot work out how it came about). But when first brother-in-law, who of course had sniffed it out, told his wife, her first sister, to tell her mother to come and have a talk with her, middle sister becomes 'interesting'. The last thing she ever wanted to be. To be interesting is to be noticed and to be noticed is dangerous. Milkman is a searingly honest novel told in prose that is as precise and unsentimental as it is devastating and brutal. A novel that is at once unlocated and profoundly tethered to place is surely a novel for our times.

Chair of judges Kwame Anthony Appiah comments:

“The language of Anna Burns’ Milkman is simply marvellous; beginning with the distinctive and consistently realised voice of the funny, resilient, astute, plain-spoken, first-person protagonist. From the opening page her words pull us into the daily violence of her world — threats of murder, people killed by state hit squads — while responding to the everyday realities of her life as a young woman, negotiating a way between the demands of family, friends and lovers in an unsettled time. The novel delineates brilliantly the power of gossip and social pressure in a tight-knit community, and shows how both rumour and political loyalties can be put in the service of a relentless campaign of individual sexual harassment….”


Read more about the Man Booker Prize here:
https://themanbookerprize.com/

Michelle de Krester's Life to Come wins The 2018 Miles Franklin Literary Award

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Michelle de Kretser has won the 2018 Miles Franklin Literary Award for her novel The Life to Come, published by Allen & Unwin. This win makes her the third woman in the Award’s 61-year history to win the top prize more than once.  

Michelle joins a select group of female multi-Award winners, including Thea Astley who won the Miles Franklin four times (1962, 1965, 1972, 2000) and is equal record holder with Tim Winton for most wins. Jessica Anderson won the Award twice (1978,1980). Michelle’s previous win was in 2013 for her novel Questions of Travel.

When describing how it feels to win the Miles Franklin for a second time, Michelle said: “I feel twice as lucky, twice as happy, and twice as honoured.”

The Miles Franklin Literary Award, recognised as Australia’s most prestigious literary prize, was established in 1954 through the will of My Brilliant Career author, Stella Maria Miles Franklin. The award is presented to novels of the “highest literary merit” that depict “Australian life in any of its phases”. Perpetual serves as Trustee for the Award.  

Michelle will receive $60,000 in prize money. Her novel was selected from a remarkable shortlist, including: Felicity Castagna’s No More Boats, Eva Hornung’s The Last Garden, Catherine McKinnon’s Storyland, Gerald Murnane’s Border Districts and Kim Scott’s Taboo.

When describing this year’s winning novel, the judges said The Life to Come is a powerful novel that effortlessly blends sharp satire of the literary world with deeply compassionate portraits of lonely people and their strategies for survival.
 
“Sentence-by-sentence, it is elegant, full of life and funny. With her characteristic wit and style, Michelle de Kretser dissects the way Australians see ourselves, and reflects on the ways other parts of the world see us,” said chair of the judging panel and State Library of NSW Mitchell Librarian Richard Neville. 

Richard Neville was joined on the 2018 judging panel by The Australian journalist and columnist, Murray Waldren, Sydney bookseller Lindy Jones, book critic Dr Melinda Harvey and Emeritus Professor Susan Sheridan.

Perpetual’s National Manager of Philanthropy, Caitriona Fay, said: “Perpetual has a long and proud history of helping philanthropists affect real change – change that can last for generations. 

“The Miles Franklin Literary Award has been supporting authors since 1957. It continues to support and shape the Australian literary landscape and broader community. We are honoured to carry on Miles Franklin’s legacy, and I congratulate all of this year’s finalists for ensuring Miles’ passion endures.”

Adam Suckling, Chief Executive of The Copyright Agency, a long-term sponsor of the Award, said: “We are deeply committed to supporting Australian writers and publishers to ensure our uniquely Australian stories continue to be told, We are delighted by Michelle de Kretser’s win. I also want to congratulate the other finalists as it is an impressive achievement to be shortlisted for this prestigious award that goes from strength to strength each year.”

The award was announced at the 2018 Melbourne Writers Festival on 26 August.

For more information about The Miles Franklin Literary Award, visit http://www.milesfranklin.com.au/

 

Limited Edition Feature from Taschen

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*Please contact our store info@oscarandfriends.com.au if you are interested in purchasing this title as this title requires a preorder.*

A production unparalleled in scale, this massive tome offers unrestricted access to hundreds of photographs from the Ferrari Archives and from private collectors, to reveal the full story behind Ferrari’s protagonists, victories, past, and future. Edited by journalist Pino Allievi and enclosed in an aluminum display case designed by Marc Newson, this unique work features a complete appendixgathering all of Ferrari’s victories since 1947.

Collector’s Edition (No. 251–1,947), each numbered and signed by Piero Ferrari.

Few are the men and brands that have come to define a century. For seven decades and counting, the Italian powerhouse founded by Enzo Ferrari in 1947 has made an indelible red mark on popular culture and enraptured fans and collectors across the globe.

Synonymous with beauty, excellence, and unmatched desirability, the Cavallino Rampante lives on as the driving force in high-performance Gran Turismo, the conqueror of impossible challenges.

A project conceived in close collaboration with Ferrari, this massive tome is a veritable collector’s piece. A production unparalleled in scale, it features exclusive content from the Ferrari Archives and private collections around the world, bringing together hundreds of unseen photographs and documents to reveal the unique story behind Ferrari’s victories, its protagonists, and its legacy.

Limited to 1,947 signed and numbered copies, this handcrafted leather-bound and hand-stitched Collector’s Edition is enclosed in a Ferrari motor–inspired aluminum case designed by Marc Newson. The Art Edition (No. 1–250) is elevated by a sculpture evocative of the 12-cylinder engine in hand-bent, flared chromed steel, also by Newson.

Collector’s Edition (No. 251–1,947), each signed by Piero Ferrari.

Also available as an Art Edition (No. 1–250), with a sculptural bookstand by Marc Newson, signed by Piero Ferrari, Sergio Marchionne, and John Elkann.

 

Features:

  • Unprecedented access to the Ferrari archives, and those of private collectors, including hundreds of unseen photographs, drawings, and sketches
  • Original documents of famed Ferrari drivers
  • Never-before-seen appendix gathering all of Ferrari’s victories since 1947

Author: Pino Allievi is an Italian writer and journalist. For years, he has documented the world of sports cars, both as a commentator of Formula 1 for Rai and writing for the likes of La Gazzetta dello Sport. Working with Enzo Ferrari, Allievi wrote Ferrari Racconta, the founder’s last work. He has authored several books not only on the history of cars, but also on its greatest heroes, whom he often knew personally. Allievi was a recipient of the journalistic prize Dino Ferrari, awarded by the creator himself.

Ferrari Art Edition 

isbn 9783836565790

Publication date: October 2018

*Please contact our store info@oscarandfriends.com.au if you are interested in purchasing this title*

CBCA Book of The Year Awards - Winners 2018

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The Children's Book Council of Australia (CBCA) have announced the Winners of the 2018 book of the Year Awards. These awards highlight an extraordinary level of creativity and talent of Australia's children's authors and illustrators. 

Of the 444 entries and 36 shortlisted titles, judges have selected one winner and two honour books for the five Book of the Year Award categories and one winner for the Crichton Award for New Illustrators.

Judges for the 2018 CBCA Book of the Year Awards commented on the wide range of themes including contemporary realism in the Older Readers entries, magical realism and historical fiction for Younger Readers, Indigenous themes and traditional outback settings in the Early Childhood category, and two high quality books with deaf children as their central characters.

The 2018 Book of the Year Award Winners

Book of the Year : Older Readers

Entries in this category may be fiction, drama or poetry and should be appropriate in style and content for readers in their secondary years of schooling. 
Ages 13-18 years (NB: These books are for mature readers)

Winner - Take Three Girls by Cath Crowley, Simmone Howell & Fiona Wood. 

Honour Books - Malee Boys by Charlie Archbold & In Dark Spaces by Cally Black

Book of the Year: Younger Readers

Entries in this category may be fiction, drama or poetry and should be appropriate in style and content for readers from the middle to upper primary years. 
Ages 8-12 years.

Winner - How to Bee by Bren MacDibble

Honour Books - Henrietta and the Perfect Night by Martine Murray and Marsh & ME by Martine Murray

Book of the Year: Early Childhood

Entries in this category may be fiction, drama or poetry and should be appropriate in style and content for children who are at pre-reading or early stages of reading.
Ages 0-7 years

Winner - Rodney Loses It! by Michael Gerald Bauer & illus by Chrissie Krebs

Honour Books - The Very Noisy Baby by Alison Lester and Hark, It's Me, Ruby Lee! by Lisa Shanahan & illus by Binny

Picture Book of the Year

Entries in this category should be outstanding books of the Picture Book genre in which the author and illustrator achieve artistic and literary unity or, in wordless picture books, where the story, theme or concept is unified through illustrations. 
Ages 0-18 years (NB. Some of these books may be for mature readers).

Winner - A Walk in the Bush by Gwyn Perkins

Honour Books - The Great Rabbit Chase by Freya Blackwood and Mopoke by Philip Bunting

Eve Pownall Award

Entries in this category should be books which have the prime intention of documenting factual material with consideration given to imaginative presentation, interpretation and variation of style. Ages 0-18 years

Winner - Do Not Lick This Book by Idan Ben-Barak & illus by Julian Frost

Honour Books - Left & right by Lorna Hendry and Koala by Claire Saxby & illus by Julie Vivas

Crichton Award for New Illustrators

The Crichton Award aims to recognise and encourage new talent in the field of Australian children's book illustration. Ages 0-18 years.

Winner - Tintinnabula by Rovina Cai

 

 

 

 

 

Longlist Announced for 2018 Man Booker Prize

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The longlist, or ‘Man Booker Dozen’, for the £50,000 Man Booker Prize has been announced.

This year’s longlist of 13 books was selected by a panel of five judges: by the philosopher Kwame Anthony Appiah (Chair); crime writer Val McDermid; cultural critic Leo Robson; feminist writer and critic Jacqueline Rose; and artist and graphic novelist Leanne Shapton.

The list was chosen from 171 submissions – the highest number of titles put forward in the prize’s 50 year history – published in the UK and Ireland between 1 October 2017 and 30 September 2018.

The Man Booker Prize for Fiction, first awarded in 1969, is open to writers of any nationality, writing in English and published in the UK and Ireland. This is the first year that novels published in Ireland are eligible for the prize, following a change in rules announced at the start of 2018 that recognised the special relationship between the UK and Irish publishing markets.

The 2018 longlist, or Man Booker ‘Dozen’, of 13 novels, is:

Author (country/territory)          Title (imprint)
Belinda Bauer (UK)                      Snap (Bantam Press)

Anna Burns (UK)                          Milkman (Faber & Faber)

Nick Drnaso (USA)                       Sabrina (Granta Books)

Esi Edugyan (Canada)                 Washington Black (Serpent’s Tail)

Guy Gunaratne (UK)                    In Our Mad And Furious City (Tinder Press)

Daisy Johnson (UK)                     Everything Under (Jonathan Cape)

Rachel Kushner (USA)                The Mars Room (Jonathan Cape)

Sophie Mackintosh (UK)              The Water Cure (Hamish Hamilton)

Michael Ondaatje (Canada)         Warlight (Jonathan Cape)

Richard Powers (USA)                 The Overstory (William Heinemann)

Robin Robertson (UK)                  The Long Take (Picador)

Sally Rooney (Ireland)                  Normal People (Faber & Faber)

Donal Ryan (Ireland)                    From A Low And Quiet Sea (Doubleday Ireland)

 

Chair of the 2018 judges, Kwame Anthony Appiah, says:

“Perhaps unsurprisingly, given the times, there were many dystopian fictions on our bookshelf – and many novels we found inspirational as well as disturbing. Some of those we have chosen for this longlist feel urgent and topical, others might have been admired and enjoyed in any year. All of these books – which take in slavery, ecology, missing persons, inner-city violence, young love, prisons, trauma, race – capture something about a world on the brink. Among their many remarkable qualities is a willingness to take risks with form. And we were struck, overall, by their disruptive power: these novels disrupted the way we thought about things we knew about, and made us think about things we didn’t know about. Still, despite what they have in common, every one of these books is wildly distinctive. It’s been an exhilarating journey so far and we’re looking forward to reading them again. But now we’ll have thousands and thousands of people reading along with us.”
 

This year’s Golden Man Booker winner Michael Ondaatje – a special one-off award that crowned the best work of fiction from the last five decades of the prize – makes the list with his seventh novel Warlight; Ondaatje’s The English Patient shared the 1992 Booker Prize with Sacred Hunger by Barry Unsworth. He is joined by three other authors previously nominated for the prize: Esi Edugyan (shortlisted in 2011 for Half-Blood Blues), Donal Ryan (longlisted in 2013 for The Spinning Heart), and Richard Powers (longlisted in 2014 for Orfeo).

Four debut novels are recognised by the judges this year, including eminent Scottish poet Robin Robertson’s The Long Take, which is a novel in verse, Sophie Mackintosh’s The Water Cure, Guy Gunaratne’s In Our Mad And Furious City and Daisy Johnson’s Everything Under. Johnson, aged 27, is the joint youngest author on the list, alongside Sally Rooney (for Normal People).

Four independent publishers are longlisted: Faber & Faber (with two titles), Granta and Serpent’s Tail. They are joined by Penguin Random House imprints Hamish Hamilton, William Heinemann, Bantam Press and Jonathan Cape (which makes the list three times); Pan Macmillan imprint Picador; Headline, owned by Hachette; and Doubleday Ireland, an imprint of Transworld Ireland.

The UK and Ireland are well-represented, with eight out of the 13 writers on the longlist. Robin Robertson is from Scotland; Belinda Bauer, Guy Gunaratne and Daisy Johnson are from England; Anna Burns is from Northern Ireland; Sophie Mackintosh is from Wales. Sally Rooney and Donal Ryan are from Ireland. Two Canadians make the list, Esi Edugyan and Michael Ondaatje, along with three Americans, Nick Drnaso, Rachel Kushner and Richard Powers. 

Luke Ellis, CEO of Man Group, comments:

“The judges have worked incredibly hard to assemble this year’s longlist, which recognises exceptional literary talent and ranges from debut writers to established novelists. My colleagues and I at Man Group would like to congratulate each of the authors selected.”
 

The shortlist and winner announcements

The shortlist of six books will be announced on Thursday 20 September at a morning press conference at Man Group, the sponsor of the prize. The shortlisted authors each receive £2,500 and a specially bound edition of their book.

The 2018 winner will then be announced on Tuesday 16 October in London’s Guildhall at a black-tie dinner, one of the highlights of the publishing year. The ceremony will be broadcast by the BBC.

The winner of the 2018 Man Booker Prize receives £50,000 and can expect international recognition. In the week following the 2017 winner announcement, sales of Lincoln in the Bardo by George Saunders increased by 1227%. Bloomsbury has to date sold over 230k copies of Lincoln across all formats, 70% of those sales coming after the win.

Speaking to The Independent following his win, Saunders described the experience of having the Man Booker judges approve of his work as “empowering”. He went on to highlight the responsibility he felt to not waste the platform that an accolade of this stature will give him: “As opportunities present themselves to me because of this, I don’t want to misuse them in any way. I don’t want to squander it. I want to use it responsibly and intelligently”.

Shortlist Announced for 2018 Miles Franklin Literary Award

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The shortlist for the prestigious Miles Franklin Literary Award 2018 includes two former winners, Kim Scott and Michelle de Kretser, and four other authors, all of whom have received literary accolades and are strong contenders to receive the $60,000 literary prize in August.

Trustee of the award, Perpetual, alongside Copyright Agency’s Cultural Fund, announced the six authors –four women and two men – on a shortlist that spans genres, histories and cultures. The novels offer readers a remarkable collection of stories dealing with disconnection, dispossession and violence as well as experiences of grief, hope and love. They reflect deeply and often humorously on Australian life in the past, present and future.

Distinctive to this year’s shortlist is the literary talent present, including previous recipients of the award, two-time winner Kim Scott for That Deadman Dance (2011) and Benang (2000), and Michelle de Kretser for Questions of Travel (2013). Joining them is Eva Hornung, whose shortlisted novel The Last Garden won the Premier’s Award in the 2018 Adelaide Festival Awards for Literature and has been shortlisted for the ALS Gold Medal; Gerald Murnane, who has been selected for the first time in his 44-year writing career despite having won much acclaim overseas; Felicity Castagna, for her first move away from her award-winning young adult and children’s fiction with No More Boats; and Catherine McKinnon, an award-winning writer of novels, plays and short stories.

The shortlist shines true to the vision of esteemed My Brilliant Career author Stella Maria Sarah Miles Franklin, who established the award through her will to showcase significant and insightful literature that presents Australian life in any of its phases.

The 2018 Miles Franklin Literary Award Shortlist is:

  • NO MORE BOATS by Felicity Castagna (Giramondo Publishing): A man, once a migrant himself, finds his world imploding. He is forced to retire, his wife has left him, and his children ignore him. The 2001 Tampa crisis is the background to his despair at the disappearance of the certainties he once knew.

     

  • THE LIFE TO COME by Michelle de Kretser (Allen & Unwin): Revolving around three characters in Sydney, Paris and Sri Lanka, this novel is about the stories we tell and don’t tell ourselves as individuals, societies and nations, and highlights how the past and future can change the present.

     

  • THE LAST GARDEN by Eva Hornung (Text Publishing): When Matthias Orion shoots his wife and himself, on the same day their son Benedict returns from boarding school, a small religious community is shattered. Benedict is struck dumb with grief. Their pastor feels his authority challenged by the tragedy. Both must come to terms with the unknowable past and the frailties of being human.

     

  • STORYLAND by Catherine McKinnon (HarperCollins Publishers): Set on Lake Illawarra, this is a compelling novel of five separate narratives which span four centuries. Ultimately all these characters are connected by blood, history, place and memory: together they tell the story of Australia.

     

  • BORDER DISTRICTS by Gerald Murnane (Giramondo Publishing): Similar to the author himself, the narrator of this novel has moved from bustling Melbourne to a small town on the Wimmera Plains, where he intends to spend the last years of his life. Mediating on fragments of his past, exhaustively and compulsively, Border Districts explores the border land between life and death.

     

  • TABOO by Kim Scott (Picador Australia – Pan Macmillan Australia): Set in present-day rural Western Australia, this novel tells the story of a group of Noongar people, who after many decades revisit a taboo area: the site of a massacre. Taboo explores how the Noongar and descendants of the family that initiated the massacre so long ago wrestle with the possibilities of reconciliation.

Speaking on behalf of the judging panel, Mitchell Librarian of the State Library of NSW, Richard Neville, said:

“The Miles Franklin 2018 shortlist engages with the complexities of Australian life in all of its phases, and the legacy of its timeless Indigenous past and its recent European present. All the novels explore how Australians connect with their complex stories, with their emotional histories, and with the legacy of colonisation. Each author in the shortlist considers what it means to live in a particular location, with unique and challenging vision. The vibrancy of contemporary Australian literature, and its relevance to thinking through the challenges of modern Australia, is confirmed with this diverse and intelligent shortlist.”

In addition to Richard Neville, the judging panel includes The Australian journalist and columnist Murray Waldren, Monash University book critic Dr Melinda Harvey, Sydney-based bookseller Lindy Jones, and Emeritus Professor Susan Sheridan.

Perpetual’s National Manager of Philanthropy, Caitriona Fay, congratulated the shortlisted authors.

“The Australian literary community continues to thrive as a result of Stella Miles Franklin’s trailblazing philanthropic endeavour more than 60 years ago. I’d like to congratulate the six shortlisted authors who, through their commitment and dedication, have created engaging novels that reflect Australian life.  Perpetual is proud to act as Trustee for the Miles Franklin Literary Award, Australia’s most prestigious literature prize.”

The Copyright Agency’s Cultural Fund gives a $5000 cash prize to each of the shortlisted authors. Chief Executive of the Copyright Agency Adam Suckling said, “What an exciting shortlist, with a great mix of emerging and established authors. Reading the shortlist is going to be a great pleasure and we are so pleased to be able to give these authors, representing the best of Australian writing, some tangible support for their stellar achievement.”

The winner of the Miles Franklin Literary Award 2018 will be announced in Melbourne on Sunday, 26 August 2018, and will receive $60,000 in prize money for the novel judged as being ‘of the highest literary merit’ and which presents ‘Australian life in any of its phases’. Each of the 2018 shortlisted authors will receive $5,000 from the Copyright Agency’s Cultural Fund.

Longlist Announced for 2018 Miles Franklin Literary Award

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Perpetual, the trustee of the Miles Franklin Literary Award, has announced eleven authors will be competing for the rich literary prize of $60,000, arguably the most prestigious literary accolade in Australia.  

The Miles Franklin Literary Award was established through the will of My Brilliant Career author, Stella Maria Sarah Miles Franklin. Patrick White, the first winner of Australia’s most prestigious literature prize was crowned in 1957 with Voss, and since then the Miles Franklin Literary Award has presented more than $1.1 million to Australian authors.

The Award shines light on some of Australia’s most talented writers, and while the prize has been given to a truly wide scope of novels, it has always remained true to the terms of Miles Franklin’s will; to be of the highest literary merit and presenting Australian life in any phase.

The 2018 Miles Franklin Literary Award longlist is:

  • Peter Carey, A Long Way from Home (Penguin Random House)
  • Felicity Castagna, No More Boats (Giramondo Publishing)
  • Michelle de Kretser, The Life to Come (Allen & Unwin)
  • Lia Hills, The Crying Place (Allen & Unwin)
  • Eva Hornung, The Last Garden (Text Publishing)
  • Wayne Macauley, Some Tests (Text Publishing)
  • Catherine McKinnon, Storyland (HarperCollins Publishers)
  • Gerald Murnane, Border Districts (Giramondo Publishing)
  • Jane Rawson, From the Wreck (Transit Lounge)
  • Michael Sala, The Restorer (Text Publishing)
  • Kim Scott, Taboo (Picador Australia - Pan Macmillan Australia)


“The longlist for the Miles Franklin Literary Award 2018 spans many genres of the novel: historical, fantastical, realist, satirical, allegorical and autobiographical,” said Richard Neville, Mitchell Librarian of the State Library of NSW and head of the Award judging panel.  “The books take us back in time to consider the effects of the past, or address the issues of contemporary life, or give glimpses of an uncertain, even frightening future.”

“Whether dealing with disconnection, dispossession, the many varieties of grief and its resolutions, the violence done to those close or those unknown, or the deeper questions of existence, the eleven longlisted novels engage and reward the reader,” added Neville.

Joining Richard Neville on the judging panel is The Australian journalist and columnist, Murray Waldren, book critic Dr Melinda Harvey, Sydney-based bookseller, Lindy Jones and Emeritus Professor, Susan Sheridan.

Perpetual’s National Manager of Philanthropy, Caitriona Fay, commended the longlisted authors.

“The authors named on this year’s longlist represent some of Australia’s most talented and provocative novelists. For more than 60 years, the Miles Franklin Literary Award has been supporting authors and helping to foster a uniquely Australian literature.

“The Award is a testament to the generosity of Miles Franklin and shows the difference one person can make to a community. Perpetual is proud to support Australia’s most prestigious literature prize. It’s a great example of how, with management, philanthropic donations can grow well beyond their original intentions.,” added Fay.

Some of the notable winners of the Miles Franklin Literary Award include: Tim Winton with Breath (2009), Dirt Music (2002), Cloudstreet (1992) and Shallows (1984).  Winton shares the crown for most wins with Thea Astley for Drylands (2000), The Acolyte (1972), The Slow Natives (1965) and The Well Dressed Explorer (1962). Peter Carey has won three times for Jack Maggs (1998), Oscar and Lucinda (1989) and Bliss (1981), and Kim Scott twice for That Deadman Dance (2011) and Benang (2000).

The shortlisted finalists will be revealed on Sunday, 17 June at the Annual Australian Booksellers Association (ABA) Gala Dinner in Canberra.  The winner announcement will be made on Sunday, 26 August in Melbourne.

Winner Announced for 2018 Man Booker International Prize

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The 2018 winner for the Man Booker International Prize is Flights by Olga Tokarczuk, translated by Jennifer Croft.

Flights is a novel about travel in the 21st century and human anatomy. From the 17th  century, we have the story of the real Dutch anatomist Philip Verheyen, who dissected and drew pictures of his own amputated leg, discovering in so doing the Achilles tendon. From the 18th century, we have the story of a North African-born slave turned Austrian courtier stuffed and put on display after his death in spite of his daughter’s ever more desperate protests, as well as the story of Chopin’s heart as it makes the covert journey from Paris to Warsaw, stored in a tightly sealed jar beneath his sister’s skirt. From the present we have the trials and tribulations of a wife accompanying her much older professor husband as he teaches a course on a cruise ship in the Greek islands, the quest of a Polish woman who emigrated to New Zealand as a teenager but must now return to Poland in order to poison her terminally ill high school sweetheart, and the slow descent into madness of a young husband whose wife and child mysteriously vanished on a vacation on a Croatian island and then appeared again with no explanation.

Through these narratives, interspersed with short bursts of analysis and digressions on topics ranging from travel-sized cosmetics to the Maori, Flights guides the reader beyond the surface layer of modernity and towards the core of the very nature of humankind.

Host a Great Book Swap This National Reconciliation Week

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As we approach National Reconciliation Week this month, we reflect on this year's theme: 'LEARN, SHARE, GROW – DON'T KEEP HISTORY A MYSTERY'. Here, we are invited to explore our past as a country; learn, share and acknowledge Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander histories and cultures; and develop a deeper understanding of our national story.

What are you doing this National Reconciliation Week? We invite you to hold a Great Book Swap in your workplace. It is an opportunity to LEARN about Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander history, culture and literature; SHARE books; and GROW your understanding of our national story. 

The idea is to swap a pre-loved book with someone else's, in exchange for a $5 donation. This helps us buy new books for children in remote communities who have few to none.  

Books are the central building blocks for learning to read, and having the ability to read opens doors to a world of choice and opportunity. This year, we are aiming to raise $300,000 from the Great Book Swap to help us gift 30,000 books in 2018. 

Sign up for the Great Book Swap here.

ABIA 2018 Winners Announced

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The Australian Publishers Association is thrilled to announce the winners of the 2018 Australian Book Industry Awards (ABIAs). 

Nevermoor picked up three awards including the major award of the night, The Gold ABIA for the Book of the Year, along with the Matt Richell Award for New Writer of the Year and Book of the Year for Younger Readers.

The inaugural Rising Star of the Year was awarded to Shalini Kunalan from Text Publishing. Publisher of the Year went to HarperCollins while Thames & Hudson received Small Publisher of the Year. Dymocks was awarded National Retailer of the Year, and once again Readings won Independent Retailer of the Year

Suzy Wilson, owner of Brisbane’s Riverbend Books and the founder of the highly respected Indigenous Literary Foundation, was presented with the Lloyd O’Neil Award for Outstanding Service to the Australian Book Industry, and the Pixie O’Harris Award for Outstanding Commitment to Children’s Literature was awarded to Jane Covernton.

See the full list of winners

 

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