2019 Women's Prize Winner - An American Marriage by Tayari Jones

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Tayari Jones has won this year’s Women’s Prize for Fiction with An American Marriage.

Kate Williams presented the author with the £30,000 prize and the ‘Bessie’, a limited edition bronze figurine. Both are anonymously endowed.

Professor Kate Williams, Chair of Judges, said: 
“This is an exquisitely intimate portrait of a marriage shattered by racial injustice. It is a story of love, loss and loyalty, the resilience of the human spirit painted on a big political canvas – that shines a light on today’s America. We all loved this brilliant book.”

Miles Franklin Literary Award 2019 Longlist Announced

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Miles Franklin Literary Award 2019 Longlist Announced!

Established in 1957 with funds from an unexpected bequest from the My Brilliant Career author, Miles Franklin‘s will, stipulated that: “the prize shall be awarded for the Novel for the year which is of the highest literary merit and which must present Australian Life in any of its phases.” 

The winner of the 2019 award will receive $60,000 in prize money.

The full longlist reads as follows:

  • Boy Swallows Universe by Trent Dalton

  • Flames by Robbie Arnott

  • The Lebs by Michael Mohammed Ahmad

  • A Sand Archive by Gregory Day

  • Inappropriation by Lexi Freiman

  • A Stolen Season by Rodney Hall

  • The Death of Noah Glass by Gail Jones

  • Too Much Lip by Melissa Lucashenko

  • Dyschronia by Jennifer Mills

  • The Lucky Galah by Tracy Sorensen

A shortlist will be announced on July 2nd, with the winner named on July 30th. 

ABIA 2019 Winners Announced!

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Book of the Year

Boy Swallows Universe by Trent Dalton

Biography Book of the Year   Eggshell Skull by Bri Lee

Biography Book of the Year

Eggshell Skull by Bri Lee

Book of the Year for Older Children (13+)   Jane Doe and the Cradle of all Worlds by Jeremy Lachlan  ( He also happens to be a very loved ex-employee of Oscar and Friends!! )

Book of the Year for Older Children (13+)

Jane Doe and the Cradle of all Worlds by Jeremy Lachlan
(He also happens to be a very loved ex-employee of Oscar and Friends!!)

Book of the Year for Younger Children (age 7-12)   The 104-Storey Treehouse by Andy Griffiths

Book of the Year for Younger Children (age 7-12)

The 104-Storey Treehouse by Andy Griffiths

Picture Book of the Year (ages 0 -6)   All the Ways to be Smart by Allison Colpoys and Davina Bell

Picture Book of the Year (ages 0 -6)

All the Ways to be Smart by Allison Colpoys and Davina Bell

General Fiction Book of the Year   The Lost Flowers of Alice Hart by Holly Ringland

General Fiction Book of the Year

The Lost Flowers of Alice Hart by Holly Ringland

General Non-Fiction Book of the Year   No Friend But the Mountain by Behrouz Boochani

General Non-Fiction Book of the Year

No Friend But the Mountain by Behrouz Boochani

International Book of the Year   Less by Andrew Sean Greer

International Book of the Year

Less by Andrew Sean Greer

Literary Fiction Book of the Year   Boy Swallows Universe by Trent Dalton

Literary Fiction Book of the Year

Boy Swallows Universe by Trent Dalton

Illustrated Book of the Year   Family by Hetty McKinnon

Illustrated Book of the Year

Family by Hetty McKinnon

Small Publishers’ Adult Book of the Year   Growing Up Aboriginal in Australia edited by Anita Heiss

Small Publishers’ Adult Book of the Year

Growing Up Aboriginal in Australia edited by Anita Heiss

Small Publishers’ Children’s Book of the Year   Whisper by Lynette Noni

Small Publishers’ Children’s Book of the Year

Whisper by Lynette Noni

The Matt Richell Award for New Writer of the Year   Boy Swallows Universe by Trent Dalton

The Matt Richell Award for New Writer of the Year

Boy Swallows Universe by Trent Dalton

Audio Book of the Year   Boy Swallows Universe by Trent Dalton

Audio Book of the Year

Boy Swallows Universe by Trent Dalton

BAD Sydney Crime Writers Festival 2019 Event

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A welcome addition to this year’s BAD Sydney Crime Writers Festival is the ‘Crime at the Library’ series where guests will have the opportunity to hear some of Australia’s award-winning true crime and crime fiction authors.

BAD Sydney, in partnership with Woollahra Library in Double Bay, will feature author, investigative journalist and 60 Minutes TV producer, Grace Tobin in conversation with Walkley Award winning investigative ABC journalist, Elise Worthington.
Grace’s book ‘Deal with the Devil’ (Penguin Random House) is the extraordinary and painful tale of the Leveson’s ordeal to grant immunity from prosecution to Michael Atkins, the man they believed was responsible for their son Matt’s death, to enable his body to be located.

 “Throughout the four-year police reinvestigation of Matt’s case, I worked closely with the Leveson’s as new revelations unfolded,” Ms Tobin said.

 “In their public quest to achieve justice for their son, what remained unwavering was their love, strength and determination. They are a force to be reckoned with and I am honoured to be sharing their story.”

Both Grace and Elise will be guests of BAD Sydney Crime Writers Festival 2019 on 6, 7 & 8 September at the State Library of NSW, Macquarie St, Sydney.

Bad Sydney is an annual event held toexplore what crime can tell us about humanity, both contemporary and historical. Past speakers have included writers, reporters and film-makers, and professionals from the justice system such as detectives, judges and psychologists.

 

WHAT BAD Sydney Crime Writers Festival 2019

WHERE   Woollahra Library 451 New South Road, Double Bay

WHEN   Thursday 23 May from 6 - 8pm

TICKETS  $10ea includes wine and canapés

BOOKINGS Woollahra Library 02) 9391 7100 library@woollahra.nsw.gov.au

 

Women's Prize for Fiction 2019 Shortlist

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The shortlist for the 2019 Women’s Prize for Fiction has been announced.

Selected from a longlist of 16 titles, the 6 shortlisted titles are:

  • The Silence of the Girls (Pat Barker, Hamish Hamilton)

  • My Sister, the Serial Killer (Oyinkan Braithwaite, Atlantic)

  • Milkman (Anna Burns, Faber)

  • Ordinary People (Diana Evans, Vintage)

  • An American Marriage (Tayari Jones, Vintage)

  • Circe (Madeline Miller, Bloomsbury).

The winner of the £30,000 (A$55,030) prize, which is presented annually to the best novel written in English by a woman, will be announced on 5 June.

ABIA SHORTLIST ANNOUNCED

The ABIA judging panel this year said it was tough to decide a shortlist in all 12 book categories.
The panel mentioned it was great to see strong collaborations between publishers and authors to produce quality books that were in competitive markets. Many of the books shortlisted were noted for their innovative pre-sale marketing and publicity campaigns, which ultimately generated good sales for the titles. Overall the judges felt positive about the standard of Australian books for 2018.

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Stella Prize Winner Announced

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The winner of the 2019 Stella Prize is Vicki Laveau-Harvie for her gripping memoir, The Erratics.

The prize was awarded Tuesday 9 April at Arts Centre Melbourne. Vicki receives $50,000, sponsored this year by National Australia Bank.

Vicki Laveau-Harvie

THE ERRATICS

“Set against the bitter cold of a Canadian winter, Vicki Laveau-Harvie’s The Erratics mines the psychological damage wrought on a nuclear family by a monstrous personality. Despite the dark subject matter, this book has a smile at its core, and Laveau-Harvie shows constant wit when depicting some harrowing times. The narrator somehow manages to see all viewpoints, and we are rewarded with an evocative and expansive view of a family that has more than its fair share of dysfunction. The writing throughout is of a consistently high standard and we were constantly delighted by this surprise of a book.”

CBCA Book of the Year Shortlist 2019

2019 Children’s Book Council of Australia (CBCA) Book of the Year Awards Announced:

The CBCA is a not-for-profit, volunteer-run organisation which aims to engage the community with literature for young Australians.

Regarded as Australia’s most prestigious children’s literature award, the CBCA Book of the Year is presented in six categories: Older Readers, Younger Readers, Early Childhood, Picture Books, the Eve Pownall Award and the CBCA Award for New Illustrator.

The nominees from the above categories are presented below:

Older Readers

Older Readers

Younger Readers

Younger Readers

Early Childhood

Early Childhood

Picture Books

Picture Books

Eve Pownall Award

Eve Pownall Award

CBCA Award for New Illustrator.

CBCA Award for New Illustrator.

2019 Stella Prize Shortlist Announced

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2019 Stella Prize shortlist of extraordinary books by Australian women

The six books are concerned with the most important questions of how to live now, and writers demonstrate first-rate critical thinking capabilities, tremendous imagination and a readiness to take risks with form.

Louise Swinn, Chair of the 2019 Judging Panel, says:

“The six finalists on the 2019 Stella Prize shortlist explode the myth of the death of the book, and they are a hearty response to the under-representation of women’s work in awards. This is an incredibly diverse knot of books, with broad subjects showing that identity is shaped across many continents and informed by many cultures. Non-fiction and fiction works stray from their formal constraints as authors give authentic voices to those who are otherwise under-represented. The books on this shortlist inform and entertain, and while they speak absolutely to our moment, their insights are timeless.”

ABIA 2019 Longlist Announced

The Australian Publishers Association has announced the longlist for the 2019 Australian Book Industry Awards (ABIAs).
The longlist introduces the titles, publishers and authors in contention for a coveted 2019 ABIA.

Voted for by the ABIA Academy — a group of more than 250 publishers, booksellers, agents, media and industry representatives — have selected books published in 2018 across 12 categories.  

BIOGRAPHY BOOK OF THE YEAR:    Back, After the Break, Osher Günsberg (HarperCollins Publishers, HarperCollins Publishers)   Butterfly on a Pin: A memoir of love, despair and reinvention , Alannah Hill (Hardie Grant Publishing, Hardie Grant Books)   Challenge Accepted!, Celeste Barber (HarperCollins Publishers, HarperCollins Publishers)   Eggshell Skull,  Bri Lee (Allen & Unwin, Allen & Unwin)   Johnathan Thurston: The Autobiography , Johnathan Thurston, with James Phelps (HarperCollins Publishers, HarperCollins Publishers)   One Hundred Years of Dirt, Rick Morton (Melbourne University Publishing, Melbourne University Press)   Speaking Up,  Gillian Triggs (Melbourne University Publishing, Melbourne University Press)   Teacher , Gabbie Stroud (Allen & Unwin, Allen & Unwin)

BIOGRAPHY BOOK OF THE YEAR:

Back, After the Break,Osher Günsberg (HarperCollins Publishers, HarperCollins Publishers)

Butterfly on a Pin: A memoir of love, despair and reinvention, Alannah Hill (Hardie Grant Publishing, Hardie Grant Books)

Challenge Accepted!,Celeste Barber (HarperCollins Publishers, HarperCollins Publishers)

Eggshell Skull, Bri Lee (Allen & Unwin, Allen & Unwin)

Johnathan Thurston: The Autobiography, Johnathan Thurston, with James Phelps (HarperCollins Publishers, HarperCollins Publishers)

One Hundred Years of Dirt,Rick Morton (Melbourne University Publishing, Melbourne University Press)

Speaking Up, Gillian Triggs (Melbourne University Publishing, Melbourne University Press)

Teacher, Gabbie Stroud (Allen & Unwin, Allen & Unwin)

BOOK OF THE YEAR FOR OLDER CHILDREN (AGES 13+):    Amelia Westlake , Erin Gough (Hardie Grant Egmont, Hardie Grant Egmont)   Between Us , Clare Atkins (Black Inc. Books, Black Inc.)   Catching Teller Crow , Ambelin Kwaymullina and Ezekiel Kwaymullina (Allen & Unwin, Allen & Unwin)   Hive , A. J. Betts (Pan Macmillan Australia, Pan Australia)   Jane Doe and the Cradle of All Worlds,  Jeremy Lachlan(Hardie Grant Egmont, Hardie Grant Egmont)   P is for Pearl,  Eliza Henry-Jones (HarperCollins Publishers, Angus & Robertson)   Small Spaces , Sarah Epstein (Walker Books Australia, Walker Books Australia)   Tales from the Inner City,  Shaun Tan (Allen & Unwin, Allen & Unwin)

BOOK OF THE YEAR FOR OLDER CHILDREN (AGES 13+):

Amelia Westlake, Erin Gough (Hardie Grant Egmont, Hardie Grant Egmont)

Between Us, Clare Atkins (Black Inc. Books, Black Inc.)

Catching Teller Crow, Ambelin Kwaymullina and Ezekiel Kwaymullina (Allen & Unwin, Allen & Unwin)

Hive, A. J. Betts (Pan Macmillan Australia, Pan Australia)

Jane Doe and the Cradle of All Worlds, Jeremy Lachlan(Hardie Grant Egmont, Hardie Grant Egmont)

P is for Pearl, Eliza Henry-Jones (HarperCollins Publishers, Angus & Robertson)

Small Spaces, Sarah Epstein (Walker Books Australia, Walker Books Australia)

Tales from the Inner City, Shaun Tan (Allen & Unwin, Allen & Unwin)

BOOK OF THE YEAR FOR YOUNGER CHILDREN (AGES 7-12):    Lenny’s Book of Everything,  Karen Foxlee (Allen & Unwin, Allen & Unwin)   Ninja Kid #1 , Anh Do and Jeremy Ley (Scholastic Australia, Scholastic Press)   Polly and Buster: The Mystery of the Magic Stones,   Sally Rippin (Hardie Grant Egmont, Hardie Grant Egmont)   Real Pigeons Fight Crime , Andrew McDonald & Ben Wood (Hardie Grant Egmont, Hardie Grant Egmont)   The 104-Storey Treehouse,  Andy Griffiths, Terry Denton (Pan Macmillan Australia, Macmillan Australia)   The Bad Guys Episode 7: Do-You-Think-He-Saurus? !, Aaron Blabey (Scholastic Australia, Scholastic Press)   The Tales of Mr Walker,   Jess Black and Sara Acton (Penguin Random House Australia, Puffin)   Wundersmith: The Calling of Morrigan Crow: Nevermoor 2 ,  Jessica Townsend (Hachette Australia Pty Ltd, Lothian Children’s Books)

BOOK OF THE YEAR FOR YOUNGER CHILDREN (AGES 7-12):

Lenny’s Book of Everything, Karen Foxlee (Allen & Unwin, Allen & Unwin)

Ninja Kid #1, Anh Do and Jeremy Ley (Scholastic Australia, Scholastic Press)

Polly and Buster: The Mystery of the Magic Stones,  Sally Rippin (Hardie Grant Egmont, Hardie Grant Egmont)

Real Pigeons Fight Crime, Andrew McDonald & Ben Wood (Hardie Grant Egmont, Hardie Grant Egmont)

The 104-Storey Treehouse, Andy Griffiths, Terry Denton (Pan Macmillan Australia, Macmillan Australia)

The Bad Guys Episode 7: Do-You-Think-He-Saurus?!, Aaron Blabey (Scholastic Australia, Scholastic Press)

The Tales of Mr Walker,  Jess Black and Sara Acton (Penguin Random House Australia, Puffin)

Wundersmith: The Calling of Morrigan Crow: Nevermoor 2,  Jessica Townsend (Hachette Australia Pty Ltd, Lothian Children’s Books)

CHILDREN’S PICTURE BOOK OF THE YEAR (AGES 0-7):    All the Ways to be Smart,  Davina Bell and Allison Colpoys (Scribe Publications, Scribble Kids’ Books)   Cicada , Shaun Tan (Hachette Australia Pty Ltd, Lothian Children’s Books)   Claris: The Chicest Mouse in Paris , Megan Hess (Hardie Grant Egmont, Hardie Grant Egmont)   Go Go and the Silver Shoes , Jane Godwin and Anna Walker (Penguin Random House Australia, Viking)   If I Was Prime Minister,  Beck and Robin Feiner(HarperCollins Publishers, ABC Books)   Love Makes a Family , Sophie Beer (Hardie Grant Egmont, Little Hare Books)   Macca the Alpaca,  Matt Cosgrove (Scholastic Australia, Koala Books)   Pig the Grub,  Aaron Blabey (Scholastic Australia, Scholastic Press)

CHILDREN’S PICTURE BOOK OF THE YEAR (AGES 0-7):

All the Ways to be Smart, Davina Bell and Allison Colpoys (Scribe Publications, Scribble Kids’ Books)

Cicada, Shaun Tan (Hachette Australia Pty Ltd, Lothian Children’s Books)

Claris: The Chicest Mouse in Paris, Megan Hess (Hardie Grant Egmont, Hardie Grant Egmont)

Go Go and the Silver Shoes, Jane Godwin and Anna Walker (Penguin Random House Australia, Viking)

If I Was Prime Minister, Beck and Robin Feiner(HarperCollins Publishers, ABC Books)

Love Makes a Family, Sophie Beer (Hardie Grant Egmont, Little Hare Books)

Macca the Alpaca, Matt Cosgrove (Scholastic Australia, Koala Books)

Pig the Grub, Aaron Blabey (Scholastic Australia, Scholastic Press)

GENERAL FICTION BOOK OF THE YEAR:    Nine Perfect Strangers, Liane Moriarty (Pan Macmillan Australia, Macmillan Australia)   Scrublands , Chris Hammer (Allen & Unwin, Allen & Unwin)   The Lost Flowers of Alice Hart,  Holly Ringland (HarperCollins Publishers, Fourth Estate)   The Lost Man,  Jane Harper (Pan Macmillan Australia, Macmillan Australia)   The Nowhere Child , Christian White (Affirm Press)   The Other Wife,  Michael Robotham (Hachette Australia Pty Ltd, Hachette Australia)   The Rúin , Dervla McTiernan (HarperCollins Publishers, HarperCollins Publishers)   The Tattooist of Auschwitz , Heather Morris (Echo Publishing, Echo Publishing)

GENERAL FICTION BOOK OF THE YEAR:

Nine Perfect Strangers,Liane Moriarty (Pan Macmillan Australia, Macmillan Australia)

Scrublands, Chris Hammer (Allen & Unwin, Allen & Unwin)

The Lost Flowers of Alice Hart, Holly Ringland (HarperCollins Publishers, Fourth Estate)

The Lost Man, Jane Harper (Pan Macmillan Australia, Macmillan Australia)

The Nowhere Child, Christian White (Affirm Press)

The Other Wife, Michael Robotham (Hachette Australia Pty Ltd, Hachette Australia)

The Rúin, Dervla McTiernan (HarperCollins Publishers, HarperCollins Publishers)

The Tattooist of Auschwitz, Heather Morris (Echo Publishing, Echo Publishing)

GENERAL NON-FICTION BOOK OF THE YEAR:    Any Ordinary Day,  Leigh Sales (Penguin Random House Australia, Hamish Hamilton)   Boys Will Be Boys , Clementine Ford (Allen & Unwin, Allen & Unwin)   Dear Santa , Samuel Johnson (Hachette Australia Pty Ltd, Hachette Australia)   No Friend But the Mountains: Writing from Manus Prison,  Behrouz Boochani, Omid Tofighian (translator) (Pan Macmillan Australia, Picador Australia)   The Arsonist , Chloe Hooper (Penguin Random House Australia, Hamish Hamilton)   The Land Before Avocado , Richard Glover (HarperCollins Publishers, ABC Books)   Welcome to Country: A Travel Guide to Indigenous Australia , Marcia Langton (Hardie Grant Publishing, Hardie Grant Travel)   Woo’s Wonderful World of Maths , Eddie Woo (Pan Macmillan Australia, Macmillan Australia)

GENERAL NON-FICTION BOOK OF THE YEAR:

Any Ordinary Day, Leigh Sales (Penguin Random House Australia, Hamish Hamilton)

Boys Will Be Boys, Clementine Ford (Allen & Unwin, Allen & Unwin)

Dear Santa, Samuel Johnson (Hachette Australia Pty Ltd, Hachette Australia)

No Friend But the Mountains: Writing from Manus Prison, Behrouz Boochani, Omid Tofighian (translator) (Pan Macmillan Australia, Picador Australia)

The Arsonist, Chloe Hooper (Penguin Random House Australia, Hamish Hamilton)

The Land Before Avocado, Richard Glover (HarperCollins Publishers, ABC Books)

Welcome to Country: A Travel Guide to Indigenous Australia, Marcia Langton (Hardie Grant Publishing, Hardie Grant Travel)

Woo’s Wonderful World of Maths, Eddie Woo (Pan Macmillan Australia, Macmillan Australia)

ILLUSTRATED BOOK OF THE YEAR:    A Painted Landscape: Across Australia from Bush to Coast , Amber Creswell Bell (Thames & Hudson Australia, Thames & Hudson Australia)   Chromatopia: An Illustrated History of Colour,  David Coles (Thames & Hudson Australia, Thames & Hudson Australia)   Family: New vegetable classics to comfort and nourish,  Hetty McKinnon (Pan Macmillan Australia, Plum)   Flour and Stone: Baked for Love, Life & Happiness, Nadine Ingram with photography by Alan Benson (Simon & Schuster Australia, Julie Gibbs for Simon & Schuster Australia)   Mirka & Georges,  Lesley Harding & Kendrah Morgan (Melbourne University Publishing, Melbourne University Press)   Resident Dog: Incredible Homes and the Dogs That Live There , Nicole England (Thames & Hudson Australia, Thames & Hudson Australia)   Special Guest,  Annabel Crabb and Wendy Sharpe (Murdoch Books, Murdoch Books)   The Cook’s Apprentice , Stephanie Alexander (Penguin Random House Australia, Lantern)

ILLUSTRATED BOOK OF THE YEAR:

A Painted Landscape: Across Australia from Bush to Coast, Amber Creswell Bell (Thames & Hudson Australia, Thames & Hudson Australia)

Chromatopia: An Illustrated History of Colour, David Coles (Thames & Hudson Australia, Thames & Hudson Australia)

Family: New vegetable classics to comfort and nourish, Hetty McKinnon (Pan Macmillan Australia, Plum)

Flour and Stone: Baked for Love, Life & Happiness,Nadine Ingram with photography by Alan Benson (Simon & Schuster Australia, Julie Gibbs for Simon & Schuster Australia)

Mirka & Georges, Lesley Harding & Kendrah Morgan (Melbourne University Publishing, Melbourne University Press)

Resident Dog: Incredible Homes and the Dogs That Live There, Nicole England (Thames & Hudson Australia, Thames & Hudson Australia)

Special Guest, Annabel Crabb and Wendy Sharpe (Murdoch Books, Murdoch Books)

The Cook’s Apprentice, Stephanie Alexander (Penguin Random House Australia, Lantern)

INTERNATIONAL BOOK OF THE YEAR:    Becoming,  Michelle Obama (Penguin Random House Australia, Viking)   CIRCE , Madeline Miller (Bloomsbury Publishing, Bloomsbury)   Fear: Trump in the White House , Bob Woodward (Simon & Schuster UK, Simon & Schuster UK)   Less , Andrew Sean Greer (Hachette Australia Pty Ltd, Abacus)   Lost Connections,  Johann Hari (Bloomsbury Publishing, Bloomsbury Circus)   Milkman , Anna Burns (Faber & Faber, Faber & Faber)   Normal People , Sally Rooney (Faber & Faber, Faber & Faber)   Ottolenghi SIMPLE , Yotam Ottolenghi (Penguin Random House Australia, Ebury Press)

INTERNATIONAL BOOK OF THE YEAR:

Becoming, Michelle Obama (Penguin Random House Australia, Viking)

CIRCE, Madeline Miller (Bloomsbury Publishing, Bloomsbury)

Fear: Trump in the White House, Bob Woodward (Simon & Schuster UK, Simon & Schuster UK)

Less, Andrew Sean Greer (Hachette Australia Pty Ltd, Abacus)

Lost Connections, Johann Hari (Bloomsbury Publishing, Bloomsbury Circus)

Milkman, Anna Burns (Faber & Faber, Faber & Faber)

Normal People, Sally Rooney (Faber & Faber, Faber & Faber)

Ottolenghi SIMPLE, Yotam Ottolenghi (Penguin Random House Australia, Ebury Press)

LITERARY BOOK OF THE YEAR:    Boy Swallows Universe, Trent Dalton (HarperCollins Publishers, Fourth Estate)   Bridge of Clay,  Markus Zusak (Pan Macmillan Australia, Picador Australia)   In the Garden of the Fugitives,  Ceridwen Dovey (Penguin Random House Australia, Hamish Hamilton)   Shell , Kristina Olsson (Simon & Schuster Australia, Scribner Australia)   The Children’s House , Alice Nelson (Penguin Random House Australia, Vintage Australia)   The Shepherd’s Hut , Tim Winton (Penguin Random House Australia, Hamish Hamilton)   Too Much Lip,  Melissa Lucashenko (The University of Queensland Press, UQP)   Wintering,  Krissy Kneen (Text Publishing, Text Publishing)

LITERARY BOOK OF THE YEAR:

Boy Swallows Universe,Trent Dalton (HarperCollins Publishers, Fourth Estate)

Bridge of Clay, Markus Zusak (Pan Macmillan Australia, Picador Australia)

In the Garden of the Fugitives, Ceridwen Dovey (Penguin Random House Australia, Hamish Hamilton)

Shell, Kristina Olsson (Simon & Schuster Australia, Scribner Australia)

The Children’s House, Alice Nelson (Penguin Random House Australia, Vintage Australia)

The Shepherd’s Hut, Tim Winton (Penguin Random House Australia, Hamish Hamilton)

Too Much Lip, Melissa Lucashenko (The University of Queensland Press, UQP)

Wintering, Krissy Kneen (Text Publishing, Text Publishing)

SMALL PUBLISHERS’ ADULT BOOK OF THE YEAR:    A Superior Spectre, Angela Meyer (Ventura Press, Peter Bishop Books)   Blakwork , Alison Whittaker (Magabala Books, Magabala Books Aboriginal Corporation)   Deep Time Dreaming , Billy Griffiths (Black Inc. Books, Black Inc.)   Growing Up Aboriginal in Australia , Dr Anita Heiss (ed.) (Black Inc Books, Black Inc.)   The Bookshop of the Broken Hearted , Robert Hillman (Text Publishing, Text Publishing)   The Geography of Friendship , Sally Piper (The University of Queensland Press, UQP)   The Western Front Diaries of Charles Bean , Edited by Peter Burness (UNSW Press, published in association with the Australian War Memorial, NewSouth)   Wild Sea: A History of the Southern Ocean,  Joy McCann (UNSW Press, NewSouth)

SMALL PUBLISHERS’ ADULT BOOK OF THE YEAR:

A Superior Spectre,Angela Meyer (Ventura Press, Peter Bishop Books)

Blakwork, Alison Whittaker (Magabala Books, Magabala Books Aboriginal Corporation)

Deep Time Dreaming, Billy Griffiths (Black Inc. Books, Black Inc.)

Growing Up Aboriginal in Australia, Dr Anita Heiss (ed.) (Black Inc Books, Black Inc.)

The Bookshop of the Broken Hearted, Robert Hillman (Text Publishing, Text Publishing)

The Geography of Friendship, Sally Piper (The University of Queensland Press, UQP)

The Western Front Diaries of Charles Bean, Edited by Peter Burness (UNSW Press, published in association with the Australian War Memorial, NewSouth)

Wild Sea: A History of the Southern Ocean, Joy McCann (UNSW Press, NewSouth)

SMALL PUBLISHERS’ CHILDREN’S BOOK OF THE YEAR:    Alfred’s War,  Rachel Bin Salleh and Samantha Fry (Magabala Books, Magabala Books Aboriginal Corporation)   Black Cockatoo,  Carl Merrison and Hakea Hustler (Magabala Books, Magabala Books Aboriginal Corporation)   Empty,  Andrew Pratley, Angel McMullan(New Frontier Publishing, Little Steps Publishing)   Heads And Tails: Insects, John Canty (author/illustrator), (Berbay Publishing, Berbay Publishing)   I Had Such Friends,  Meg Gatland-Veness (Pantera Press, Pantera Press)   Night Walk,  Alison Binks (writer and illustrator), (Berbay Publishing, Berbay Publishing)   Rhyme Cordial,  Antonia Pesenti (Scribe Publications, Scribble Kids’ Books)   The Extremely Weird Thing that Happened in Huggabie Falls,  Adam Cece (illustrated by Andrew Weldon) (Text Publishing, Text Publishing)   Whisper,  Lynette Noni (Pantera Press, Pantera Press)

SMALL PUBLISHERS’ CHILDREN’S BOOK OF THE YEAR:

Alfred’s War, Rachel Bin Salleh and Samantha Fry (Magabala Books, Magabala Books Aboriginal Corporation)

Black Cockatoo, Carl Merrison and Hakea Hustler (Magabala Books, Magabala Books Aboriginal Corporation)

Empty, Andrew Pratley, Angel McMullan(New Frontier Publishing, Little Steps Publishing)

Heads And Tails: Insects,John Canty (author/illustrator), (Berbay Publishing, Berbay Publishing)

I Had Such Friends, Meg Gatland-Veness (Pantera Press, Pantera Press)

Night Walk, Alison Binks (writer and illustrator), (Berbay Publishing, Berbay Publishing)

Rhyme Cordial, Antonia Pesenti (Scribe Publications, Scribble Kids’ Books)

The Extremely Weird Thing that Happened in Huggabie Falls, Adam Cece (illustrated by Andrew Weldon) (Text Publishing, Text Publishing)

Whisper, Lynette Noni (Pantera Press, Pantera Press)

THE MATT RICHELL AWARD FOR NEW WRITER OF THE YEAR:    Boy Swallows Universe,  Trent Dalton (HarperCollins Publishers, Fourth Estate)   The Nowhere Child,  Christian White (Affirm Press, -)   Eggshell Skull,  Bri Lee (Allen & Unwin, Allen & Unwin)   One Hundred Years of Dirt,  Rick Morton (Melbourne University Publishing, Melbourne University Press)   Teacher , Gabbie Stroud (Allen & Unwin, Allen & Unwin)   The Lost Flowers of Alice Hart,  Holly Ringland (HarperCollins Publishers, Fourth Estate)   The Rúin,   Dervla McTiernan (HarperCollins Publishers, HarperCollins Publishers)   The Tattooist of Auschwitz , Heather Morris (Echo Publishing, Echo Publishing)

THE MATT RICHELL AWARD FOR NEW WRITER OF THE YEAR:

Boy Swallows Universe, Trent Dalton (HarperCollins Publishers, Fourth Estate)

The Nowhere Child, Christian White (Affirm Press, -)

Eggshell Skull, Bri Lee (Allen & Unwin, Allen & Unwin)

One Hundred Years of Dirt, Rick Morton (Melbourne University Publishing, Melbourne University Press)

Teacher, Gabbie Stroud (Allen & Unwin, Allen & Unwin)

The Lost Flowers of Alice Hart, Holly Ringland (HarperCollins Publishers, Fourth Estate)

The Rúin,  Dervla McTiernan (HarperCollins Publishers, HarperCollins Publishers)

The Tattooist of Auschwitz, Heather Morris (Echo Publishing, Echo Publishing)

Walter Scott Prize Longlist Announced

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The Walter Scott Prize for Historical Fiction, now in its tenth year, has just announced the 2019 Longlist.

The Longlist of twelve is:

Little by Edward Carey (Gallic Books)

A Long Way From Home by Peter Carey (Faber)

After The Party by Cressida Connolly (Viking)

Washington Black by Esi Edugyan (Serpent’s Tail)

The Western Wind by Samantha Harvey (Jonathan Cape)

Dark Water by Elizabeth Lowry (riverrun)

Now We Shall Be Entirely Free by Andrew Miller (Sceptre)

Warlight by Michael Ondaatje (Jonathan Cape)

The Wanderers by Tim Pears (Bloomsbury)

The Long Take by Robin Robertson (Picador)

All The Lives We Never Lived by Anuradha Roy (Maclehose Press)

Tombland by C J Sansom (Mantle)

The Judges said:

“Since its founding in 2009, the Walter Scott Prize has grown in standing and is now a trusted kitemark for the very best historical fiction from the UK and Ireland, as well as a platform from which to introduce exciting voices from the Commonwealth.

“Our tenth longlist features wonderful stories from both the recent and distant past, with diverse settings; from jostling cities and insular villages to vast open spaces and wild oceans. We meet some unforgettable characters – an Australian long-distance rally driver; a diminutive Swiss orphan who becomes Madame Tussaud; a middle-class English housewife caught up in Oswald Mosley’s fascist movement; a young man ‘freed’ from slavery on a journey across the globe. Choosing a shortlist from these corkers is going to be a tough task for the judges.”

Women's Prize for Fiction 2019 Longlist Announced

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The Women’s Prize for Fiction is one of the most respected, most celebrated and most successful literary awards in the world. An annual award, it celebrates the very best full length fiction written by women throughout the world. Through the initiatives and promotions set up by the WPFF, even appearing on the shortlist significantly boosts a novel’s sales and ensures an author’s work will be promoted in bookshops and libraries all over the world.

This year’s sixteen longlisted books span both new and well-established writers and a range of genres, including seven debut novels.

The 2019 longlist is:

The Silence of the Girls by Pat Barker
Remembered by Yvonne Battle-Felton
My Sister, the Serial Killer by Oyinkan Braithwaite
The Pisces by Melissa Broder
Milkman by Anna Burns
Freshwater  by Akwaeke Emezi
Ordinary People by Diana Evans
Swan Song Kelleigh by Greenberg-Jephcott
An American Marriage by Tayari Jones
Number One Chinese by Restaurant Lillian Li
Bottled Goods by Sophie van Llewyn
Lost Children by Archive Valeria Luiselli
Praise Song for the Butterflies by Bernice L. McFadden
Circe by Madeline Miller
Ghost Wall by Sarah Moss
Normal People by Sally Rooney

Australian Indie Book Awards 2019 Shortlist Announced

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Celebrating Australian literary talent

The Australian Indie Book Awards recognise and reward the best Australian writing as chosen by Australian Independent Booksellers.
The Awards celebrate the enormous depth and range of literary talent in this nation. 

Each November, booksellers, members of Leading Edge Books group of independent bookstores are invited to submit their bookshop’s favourite titles of a calendar year. Titles must be published in original edition between 1 January and 31 December and are entirely authored and illustrated by current Australian citizens and permanent residents.
A Longlist of titles is compiled and announced in December and a Shortlist of 24 titles (4 titles per category) are announced in late January.
The shortlisted titles are reviewed by an independent judging panel made up of representatives from bookstores and a Leading Edge Books Head Office staff member.  A winner is chosen in each category, then an overall Book of the Year winner voted on from the six category winners.  

The 2019 shortlist is comprised of titles from the following categories:


Fiction

The Lost Man by Jane Harper (Macmillan Australia)

Shell by Kristina Olsson (Scribner Australia)

The Shepherd's Hut by Tim Winton (Penguin Random House Australia)

Bridge of Clay by Markus Zusak (Picador Australia)

Non-Fiction

The Land Before Avocado by Richard Glover (ABC Books, HarperCollins Australia)

The Arsonist by Chloe Hooper (Penguin Random House Australia)

Eggshell Skull by Bri Lee (Allen & Unwin)

Any Ordinary Day by Leigh Sales (Penguin Random House Australia)

Debut Fiction

Boy Swallows Universe by Trent Dalton (HarperCollins Australia)

Scrublands by Chris Hammer (Allen & Unwin)

The Tattooist of Auschwitz by Heather Morris (Echo Publishing)

The Nowhere Child by Christian White (Affirm Press)

Illustrated Non-Fiction

A Painted Landscape: Across Australia from Bush to Coast by Amber Creswell Bell (Thames & Hudson Australia)

Marcia Langton: Welcome to Country by Marcia Langton (Hardie Grant Travel)

Family: New Vegetable Classics to Comfort and Nourish by Hetty McKinnon (Plum)

Australian Dreamscapes by Claire Takacs (Hardie Grant Books)

Children's (up to 12yrs)

All the Ways to be Smart by Davina Bell & Allison Colpoys (Illus) (Scribe Publications)

Lenny's Book of Everything by Karen Foxlee (Allen & Unwin)

Tales from the Inner City by Shaun Tan (Allen & Unwin)

Wundersmith: The Calling of Morrigan Crow by Jessica Townsend (Hachette Australia)

Young Adult (12yrs+)

Hive by A. J. Betts (Pan Australia)

Amelia Westlake by Erin Gough (Hardie Grant Egmont)

A Song Only I Can Hear by Barry Jonsberg (Allen & Unwin)

Catching Teller Crow by Ambelin Kwaymullina & Ezekiel Kwaymullina (Allen & Unwin)

2019 Stella Prize Longlist Announced

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The $50,000 Stella Prize celebrates literature penned by Australian women. First awarded in 2013, the Stella Prize is named for ‘My Brilliant Career’ author Stella Maria Sarah ‘Miles’ Franklin, and has become a landmark prize in the Australian literary scene. This year, some 170 entries were narrowed down to just twelve.

In this years Stella Prize longlist, the twelve books cover sexual assault, arson and its consequences, parental neglect, issues of mental health, dysfunctional and complicated family life, chronic illness, and inherited pain.
Each is concerned with the most important questions of how to live now, and writers demonstrate first-rate critical thinking capabilities, tremendous imagination, and a readiness to take risks with form.

Read more about the Stella Prize here - https://thestellaprize.com.au/

Judges' report

Reading for the Stella Prize means reading most of the books by Australian women published in 2018 – it’s a sample of the zeitgeist, a look at what is informing our thinking right now, and it has been an honour. The overall quality of submissions this year was outstanding. In looking to award a work of literature that is excellent, original and engaging, we found many genuine contenders for the prize this year and narrowing down to twelve has been a considerable challenge – a testament to the health of women’s writing today.

It feels like a big year for fiction, and our longlist reflects this. As well as some strong debuts, it was reassuring to see so many books from writers whose work we have admired for some time. Family relations and the persistence of the past in the present continue to inspire writers, and several books were concerned with the aftermath of trauma, especially sexual violence. Realism continues to dominate Australian fiction, with a few standout departures into other modes.

We wished for more representations of otherness and diversity from publishers: narratives from outside Australia, from and featuring women of colour, LGBTQIA stories, Indigenous stories, more subversion, more difference.

Notwithstanding this, we found a great deal to admire, and rediscovered the joy of reading anew every time we found a surprise.

Ultimately, we chose books that strove for something big and fulfilled their own ambitions. We fell in love with some curious and funny narratives, some dark and intellectual stories, some lyrical and poetic observations, some youthful wisdom, and the audacious frivolity of age. This longlist has humour but is never frivolous – all the books are of a high calibre, showing first-rate critical thinking capabilities, and tremendous imagination. We were educated and entertained by writers of all ages, and each of the writers here managed to delight us. These are all artists concerned with the most important questions of our age and how to live now, and it has been a pleasure to be in their company.

Anna Burns' Milkman wins the 2018 Man Booker Prize

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Anna Burns’ third novel ‘Milkman’ has won the 2018 Man Booker Prize.
The Man Booker Prize, celebrating its 50th anniversary, is worth around $66,000 and Burns is the first writer from Northern Ireland to have be awarded.

In an interview posted by the Man Booker Prize foundation, Burns said that ‘Milkman’ was inspired by her own experience. “I grew up in a place that was rife with violence, distrust and paranoia, and peopled by individuals trying to navigate and survive in that world as best as they could.”

Set in an un-named city but with an astonishing, breath-shorteningly palpable sense of time and place ‘Milkman’ is a tale of gossip and hearsay, silence and deliberate deafness. The story of inaction with enormous consequences and decisions that are never made, but for which people are judged and punished. Middle sister is our protagonist. She is busy attempting to keep her mother from discovering her nearly-boyfriend and to keep everyone in the dark about her encounter with milkman (which she herself for the life of her cannot work out how it came about). But when first brother-in-law, who of course had sniffed it out, told his wife, her first sister, to tell her mother to come and have a talk with her, middle sister becomes 'interesting'. The last thing she ever wanted to be. To be interesting is to be noticed and to be noticed is dangerous. Milkman is a searingly honest novel told in prose that is as precise and unsentimental as it is devastating and brutal. A novel that is at once unlocated and profoundly tethered to place is surely a novel for our times.

Chair of judges Kwame Anthony Appiah comments:

“The language of Anna Burns’ Milkman is simply marvellous; beginning with the distinctive and consistently realised voice of the funny, resilient, astute, plain-spoken, first-person protagonist. From the opening page her words pull us into the daily violence of her world — threats of murder, people killed by state hit squads — while responding to the everyday realities of her life as a young woman, negotiating a way between the demands of family, friends and lovers in an unsettled time. The novel delineates brilliantly the power of gossip and social pressure in a tight-knit community, and shows how both rumour and political loyalties can be put in the service of a relentless campaign of individual sexual harassment….”


Read more about the Man Booker Prize here:
https://themanbookerprize.com/